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13 Questions With… Lina Gordaneer

Posted by CLA Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-10-30

The Canadian Library Association (CLA) has designated the fourth Monday in October as National School Library Day.

To mark this special day, this week we are profiling librarians and library technicians who work in the school library sector: 13 Questions + 3 bonus questions about school librarianship.

Lina Gordaneer

Librarian, Trafalgar School For Girls, Montreal

Photo of Lina Gordaneer

A hero who has inspired you in your career?

My friend from high school Eric Craven (got his MLIS at McGill in 2000), who was responsible for convincing me to move to Montreal and becoming a librarian in the first place, is doing some AMAZING work at the Atwater library with the digital literacy project. He works with a lot of community outreach groups and does so much with so little. He’s like the new frontier of librarianship in my books (pun intended). Check it out!

The first job you ever held and at what age?

My first job was at the age of 14 as a bus girl in a pirate-themed burger joint. Part of my job was to shape the hamburger patties, which involved dipping my hands repeatedly in a busser’s container full of raw ground beef. I was vegetarian for several years after that.

Your first position in the library and/or information services field?

At the age of 16, I was a page for the Oak Bay Public Library in Victoria, BC.

Coolest thing in your cubicle or office?

Well, I do have an autographed portrait of Jennifer Lawrence as she filmed a scene from X-Men in one of our French classrooms. That’s pretty exciting.

Oh, but not to be outdone by a marble bust of good ol’ Dante. The students really like to dress him up for the holidays.

What is your guilty pleasure?

Whiskey (can I say that?). And movies with car crashes in it.

Career advice – what’s your top tip?

Be brazen, curious and unafraid of failure.

Have an idea? Try it out. If it works, yay! If not, try something else.

If you are in a workplace that doesn’t allow you to try out new ideas? Quit.

What useless skill(s) do you possess?

Hmmm. This is a hard one as I don’t have many skills – the ones I do have I feel are pretty useful.

Ok, the fact that I can recognise a two bit actor from the 80s in a newish TV legal drama without any problem, but I can’t recognise that person who just said hi like they knew me and apparently I have met on several occasions. I think there is something wrong with my brain.

Proudest moment in your professional life?

I got John Green to talk at our school. I have been riding on the coattails of that success for several years now…

If you had 24 hours all to yourself, how would you best like to spend it?

24 hours? Wha? That would be crazy. Get up later than 5 am. Drink coffee. Do some writing. Go for a long run. Have a bath in which I read a good book until the water gets cold. Eat something. Read more. Write more. Go for a walk. Nice dinner, nice wine, good movie with a car crash in it. Go to bed and sleep. Wait. That’s like my weekend…

If you didn’t work in the information industry, what would you be doing?

I’d like to say writing fiction. Well, I do that anyways, but if I wasn’t working I could do it more. But then again, everyone knows you can’t make a living off writing so…I have no idea. I think I was born to be a librarian. My mom told me I even came into the world with the pointy little glasses, a bun and a severe “shh” face.

Finish this sentence: “In high school, I would have been voted the person most likely to … “

Quietly beat you over the head with my large, pretentious collected works of Dostoyevsky if you dared talk to me. Heck, even look at me.

I was such a charmer.

How do you stay current in your field?

I read a lot of blogs/magazines (I have a pretty full Feedly), talk to my colleagues, go to conferences. I am always looking for ways in which I can serve the staff and students at my school. I also use social media to see what other people in the profession are doing (Ok, I lurk. I’ll admit it).

The field of education and teaching is constantly in flux from curriculum to funding, from technologies to staffing. What opportunities does the frequency of change, for better or for worse, present to the library community and to users?

Oh fine. Leave the hard questions for last.

My position is a little unique in that I am working for an all girls, English private school in Montreal. The last few years have been especially hard politically, as the provincial government has launched a double attack – one, making it harder for potential students to attend English schools and recently by cutting funding to private schools.

But that doesn’t mean there are not opportunities. The librarian is uniquely positioned to serve the community in the following way:

1. Take part in building your Digital citizenship program for the school, from information literacy (more and more necessary) to how to use technology mindfully. I truly believe this is where librarians can shine- with our core belief in access to information and our ability to present to students ways in which they can not only consume online but create, this is where we should be putting a lot of our efforts.

2. Curriculum changes- that means teachers and students will have different information needs. Make sure you are listening to the teachers and responding to their needs and soon they will see you as indispensable [insert evil laughter here].

3. Embrace technology – the teachers at my school are extremely dedicated and committed to their students but they are classically strapped for time. Get to know the tools that they need to know and become a go-to person for that technology. Share ideas via your network/blogs, etc so that they always have something they can be inspired with.

4. Books too! That doesn’t mean your role as reader’s advisory gets to lag. From the kid who reads so much you can’t get new books in fast enough, to the ones who are best served by audio books, reading is still super important, at least in my school. It is valued and supported by the teachers. We have a Community Reads project every summer as well as a book café that meets every month and a Battle of the books team that competes with other schools. Reading is a big part of our school life.

What should every information professional know about school librarianship?

Make yourself (ok, fine. The library) essential.

I have always treated the school library like you would a special library: you have to promote yourself aggressively and show them that you are an essential part of the school. It is not enough to simply do the traditional library occupations (collection development, etc.). You have to infiltrate! Get to know the teachers, launch programs, make yourself available for presentations, provide them with resources that make their life easier.

Biggest surprise working in this sector?

That I actually like teenage girls. I didn’t so much when I was one (see above response).

But seriously, I came from public libraries where I was a Youth librarian. The biggest surprise was how much easier it was to develop a rapport with the students and how much they asked my opinion for their next read. I do way more Reader’s advisory as a high school librarian than I ever did as a public librarian.

What would you like your headstone to read?

She ran,
she wrote,
she read,
she ranted
a lot.
RIP
(at least try, ok?)

Posted in 13 Questions, People, School libraries | Leave a Comment »

13 Questions With… Colleen Morawski

Posted by CLA Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-10-29

The Canadian Library Association (CLA) has designated the fourth Monday in October as National School Library Day.

To mark this special day, this week we are profiling librarians and library technicians who work in the school library sector: 13 Questions + 3 bonus questions about school librarianship.

Colleen Morawski

Librarian, St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Secondary School (London, Ont)

Photo of Colleen Morawski

A hero who has inspired you in your career?

Part-time librarians used to come in every other day and they inspired me with their fresh ideas for the library. I reach out to them often now that they are off running their own libraries.

The first job you ever held and at what age?

Supermarket cashier at 15 years of age

Your first position in the library and/or information services field?

Library helper in my elementary school library

Coolest thing in your cubicle or office?

A spring origami flower garden. A student ‘planted’ one at a time on our large circ desk and he grew confident with all the compliments. He is making snowmen right now but hopefully they won’t go up for a while!

What is your guilty pleasure?

‘Women’s magazines’ they count as reading right?

Career advice – what’s your top tip?

Top tip would be you must enjoy children-of all ages!

What useless skill(s) do you possess?

I think all my skills are useful…to somebody!

Proudest moment in your professional life?

The first time a struggling student told me ‘I have never finished a whole novel and actually liked it!’

If you had 24 hours all to yourself, how would you best like to spend it?

Reading, of course!

If you didn’t work in the information industry, what would you be doing?

I honestly can’t imagine not working in a library.

Finish this sentence: “In high school, I would have been voted the person most likely to … “

Escape and never return! Now I enjoy the high school environment – probably because I am in charge!

How do you stay current in your field?

My colleagues with the board provide endless support, ideas and enthusiasm.

The field of education and teaching is constantly in flux from curriculum to funding, from technologies to staffing. What opportunities does the frequency of change, for better or for worse, present to the library community and to users?

For better or for worse we are all in it together.

What should every information professional know about school librarianship?

You are there to help them learn but you learn so much from them.

Biggest surprise working in this sector?

Biggest surprise is the lack of funding to such a valuable resource – our children.

What would you like your headstone to read?

Beloved daughter, sister and wife.

Posted in 13 Questions, People, School libraries | Leave a Comment »

Top 10 Cloud Myths

Posted by CLA Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-10-28

Cloud computing is uniquely susceptible to the perils of myths due to the nature, confusion and hype surrounding it, according to Gartner, Inc. These myths slow things down, impede innovation and induce fear, thus distracting from real progress, innovation and outcomes.

“Cloud computing, by its very nature, is uniquely vulnerable to the risks of myths. It is all about capabilities delivered as a service, with a clear boundary between the provider of the service and the consumer,” said David Mitchell Smith, vice president and Gartner Fellow. “From a consumer perspective, ‘in the cloud’ means where the magic happens, where the implementation details are supposed to be hidden. So it should be no surprise that such an environment is rife with myths and misunderstandings.”

Even with a mostly agreed on formal definition, multiple perspectives and agendas still conspire to mystify the subject ever more. Add the incessant hype and there can be a resultant confusion that permeates IT (and beyond) today. Gartner has highlighted some of the most dangerous and misleading cloud myths:

  1. Cloud Is Always About Money
  2. You Have to Be Cloud to Be Good
  3. Cloud Should Be Used for Everything
  4. “The CEO Said So” Is a Cloud Strategy
  5. We Need One Cloud Strategy or Vendor
  6. Cloud Is Less Secure Than On-Premises Capabilities
  7. Cloud Is Not for Mission-Critical Use
  8. Cloud = Data Center
  9. Migrating to the Cloud Means You Automatically Get All Cloud Characteristics
  10. Virtualization = Private Cloud

For more information, visit: http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2889217

Posted in Technology, Trends | Leave a Comment »

Release date of RSC Panel on Status and Future of Canada’s Libraries and Archives

Posted by CLA Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-10-28

The RSC Expert Panel report on The Future Now: Canada’s Libraries, Archives, and Public Memory, will be released on November 13.

 

Posted in Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel | Leave a Comment »

13 Questions With… Carmelita Cechetto-Shea

Posted by CLA Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-10-28

The Canadian Library Association (CLA) has designated the fourth Monday in October as National School Library Day.

To mark this special day, this week we are profiling librarians and library technicians who work in the school library sector: 13 Questions + 3 bonus questions about school librarianship.

Carmelita Cechetto-Shea

Library Support Consultant, Cape Breton-Victoria Regional School Board

Photo of Carmelita Cechetto-Shea

A hero who has inspired you in your career?

There is no hesitation as to whom was my hero inspiring me for this career. My father had a grade 3 education; he was the baby in a family of 8 and had to work at a young age to help support the family. He was an avid reader, and self-taught himself to read as an adult. He read every Louis L’Amour novel, and one needed to get the local newspaper because he read EVERY word, even news articles that didn’t really mean anything to him. As an Italian immigrant who came to Canada knowing NO English, his accomplishment was awesome. He died during my first year in my career, but I know his example instilled the love of reading in my heart and a good reason to be in a career I truly love.

The first job you ever held and at what age?

Growing up in a “corner store,” also known as a convenience store, it was inevitable that my first job was to help behind the cash. I think I was about 10 when I started doing cash transactions, under the watchful eye of my mother. Honestly, my wages were probably in the shape of ice cream, candy, and chocolate!

Your first position in the library and/or information services field?

In 1983, I began a career as a library assistant to a high school librarian. It was an amazing moment in my life because it was my own high school and I was going to be working with my high school librarian Mr. Stephen Muise. During high school, I was a bit afraid of this bold and dynamic man, but after I worked with him for only a short while, I discovered he was a teddy bear!

Coolest thing in your cubicle or office?

Front and centre in my office is a funny action figure of Nancy Pearl, American Librarian and author. Featuring Pearl with a stack of books and a finger to her lips, the doll’s “push to shush” action was popular with some librarians and dismaying to others who felt that the doll reinforced librarian stereotypes. Pearl herself said that the shushing aspect of the action figure would determine “which librarians have a sense of humor.”

What is your guilty pleasure?

One only needs to step into a room in my basement to discover my second passion (reading is first) and definitely a guilty passion…scrapbooking. My husband jokes when we go into the local craft store and asks the sale people if they “want to buy supplies from me”. I guess you are hooked when the sale people all know your name and face.

Career advice – what’s your top tip?

In a school environment, one must realize that the students are like sponges, they absorb information quickly and it is crucial to instill the love of reading to every child from Grade Primary to 12. Be yourself, share your joy of reading, and never give up on the comment “I hate to read”.

What useless skill(s) do you possess?

I can click both baby fingers to make a noise. Guess they need to be oiled!

Proudest moment in your professional life?

It is hard to answer this question with one example. I have been blessed with two special moments where I knew that being in school libraries was where I belong.

In 2008, I received the Librarian Technician award at the Canadian Library Association in Vancouver, British Columbia; it was a moment I will never forget, and never expected to win because the person before me was also from Nova Scotia, a colleague and a friend, and I was doubtful that two Nova Scotians would win the award back to back. I was wrong. Then in 2012, I received the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal, nominated for my work with the Adopt-A-Library Literacy Program where students around the world compete in a WOW Reading Challenge. Each year I coordinate the competition in my school board with over 6000 students read books in grades from Primary-12. Last year, schools in my board excelled in all divisions claiming the title of “World Champions” in 5/6 categories.

If you had 24 hours all to yourself, how would you best like to spend it?

Being alone is something I don’t often have, but if I did, I would probably read every book I could that is on my “to read” list which keeps growing in my home. We all have them, the books that you want to read, but yet take forever to begin reading. For “breaks” from the reading, I probably would scrapbook. Having my two passions together, my greatest diversions to the world outside would help pass those 24 hours very quickly.

If you didn’t work in the information industry, what would you be doing?

As a child, I always wanted to be a vet. This “dream” faltered when I hit high school and discovered that I was not very science oriented. I could easily be one of those old ladies with a millions cats, and maybe a dozen or two dogs as well. I’ve been known to take in strays, cry at movies when an animal dies, and want to pet every cat or dog I see. My mother believed this would not be my chosen career as she knew that I could not put down an animal even if it was the humane thing to do and necessary. A friend’s dog I have dog sat is currently not doing very well, and just thinking about the “inevitable” has me in tears. Yes, being in the information industry is where I belong.

Finish this sentence: “In high school, I would have been voted the person most likely to … “

…who entered politics or law. A former teacher compared me with a local female politician on numerous occasions. The law option probably came from my “ability” to argue forever. Both career paths were probably “highlighted” because of my “gift of gab”.

How do you stay current in your field?

I remain as current as possible in the field with the help of many tools: professional journals (print and online), Internet sites, engaging in professional development whenever possible, and belonging to various associations where colleagues engage in sharing new trends, ideas, and experiences.

I belong to 3 associations: Canadian Library Association (CLA), Nova Scotia Association of Library Technicians (NSALT), and the Nova Scotia Library Association (NSLA). Depending on the locations, I attend the conferences of these mentioned associations. I also believe in becoming a “doer” and not just a member in an association. I currently am completing year 4 out of 5 of my term on the Canadian Library Association Young Adult Award Committee which will end at the conference in Halifax in 2016. I am also the Past President of the Nova Scotia Association of Library Technicians, a position it seems that I have held for three terms. At NSLA, I usually attend as an exhibitor for the NSALT group.

Lately, I seem to be constantly drawn more and more towards social media to help me be aware in the field; whether it is Twitter or Facebook or LinkedIn, the information is instantaneously before me. It could be news of a book release, or discovering when the next conference is, or an opportunity for professional development.

The field of education and teaching is constantly in flux from curriculum to funding, from technologies to staffing. What opportunities does the frequency of change, for better or for worse, present to the library community and to users?

Change is a concept that can cause fear in some and hope for others. Without change, one cannot grow intellectually. Learning is a lifelong journey, and if one is not open to change of new ideas, beliefs, theories and opportunities, one will be stagnant both professionally and personally. Accepting the changes will enable you to support the students and staff in the schools so that their learning experience and development achieve the best opportunity and education possible. For me change is a very positive part of growing as a person and using that growth to serve the “patrons” better. Change gives the opportunity to succeed in making someone else value the library.

What should every information professional know about school librarianship?

School librarianship is a field that never stands still for very long. With the changes as mentioned above, it is evident that a school librarian must adapt quickly, accepting that adaptation with a positive outlook and an open mind. The field of school librarianship will give you memories to make you smile, whether it is the smile of a Primary student reading their first book or the student in Grade 12 crossing the stage on graduation night. As a school librarian, you have the power and duty shape the leaders of the future. You will need creativity, patience, compassion, consideration and a zest to learn with the students. And ultimately, a school librarian must be able to laugh at themselves and accept that each student that crosses your path matters.

Biggest surprise working in this sector?

I’ve grown up all my life surrounded by books yet I was surprised to realize that I am not the only person passionate about reading, books, and wanting to share the joy of reading. Several years ago, I met a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police who had created a program with the motto “fighting crime one book at a time”. His work gave him the impetus to try and help children to grasp the concept of reading as a solution to getting involved in crime; instead he discovered a window of opportunity to reach children in schools and public libraries with a program that now encompasses the globe. This program gave me renewed hope for the future that our students, our children and the leaders of tomorrow, will embrace reading as an everyday task, just like brushing their teeth!

What would you like your headstone to read?

“The world was hers for the reading.”― Betty Smith, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

Posted in 13 Questions, People, School libraries | Leave a Comment »

Northern Exposure to Leadership Institute (NELI) 2015

Posted by CLA Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-10-27

The 13th Northern Exposure to Leadership Institute (NELI) will be held in Emerald Lake, British Columbia, from March 29 to April 4, 2015.

Please see http://northernexposuretoleadership.ca/ for ‘Nomination Criteria’, as well as other pertinent information.

The Institute’s mission is to assist professional librarians aspiring to leadership roles to develop, strengthen, and evolve their leadership potential so that they may be better equipped to lead Canada’s libraries or information service organizations or programs in the 21st century.

Based on the premise of experiential learning, the Institute includes group and individual learning experiences, and the opportunity to learn in conversation with mentors, who have been chosen for their own accomplishments and their leadership skills.

Northern Exposure, at this call, will be targeting forty-two (42) librarians, with the successful participants chosen from the nominees.

Nominees must:

  1. have a desire to develop their leadership potential and aggressively aspire to visible leadership roles in library and information service organizations;
  2. have received their library degrees, generally, within the past seven years; and,
  3. have a minimum of two year’s professional library experience and a generally a maximum of seven years.

Individual nominations will be welcomed from a variety of sources, including employers, associations, library and information studies programs, and the corporate information services sector including sector vendors.

Nominees will be asked to supply:

  • a résumé or curriculum vitae,
  • a one-page synopsis of achievements,
  • a prospective career development program/path and
  • their expectations for the Institute.

Those chosen as participants must secure funding to cover the registration fee and transportation to Calgary, Alberta including any pre- or post-NELI accommodations in Calgary. Meals, Emerald Lake Lodge accommodation as well as program and learning materials will be provided while attending the Institute.

Nominations must be received by January 5, 2015.

Please direct any questions to:

Ernie Ingles,
Executive Director,
Northern Exposure to Leadership Institute,
E-mail: ernie.ingles@shaw.ca

Posted in Events | Leave a Comment »

13 Questions With… Geoffrey Allen

Posted by CLA Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-10-27

The Canadian Library Association (CLA) has designated the fourth Monday in October as National School Library Day.

To mark this special day, this week we are profiling librarians and library technicians who work in the school library sector: 13 Questions + 3 bonus questions about school librarianship.

Geoffrey Allen

Supervisor, Library & Resources Services, Waterloo Region District School Board

Photo of Geoffrey Allen

A hero who has inspired you in your career?

No heroes. Don’t believe in them. I have to say, though, that I’ve met a lot of inspiring people through my several careers.

The first job you ever held and at what age?

Newspaper delivery boy, at 12 years old. A loathsome time.

Your first position in the library and/or information services field?

Teacher-Librarian at a downtown Toronto elementary school. Earlier in life I had been advised to consider a career in librarianship, but the thought of working in a stuffy library (as I imagined them) was anathema to me. It wasn’t until I accepted the role as teacher-librarian that I discovered there’s a big difference between studying in a library and working in a library. It turns out that libraries aren’t so stuffy after all.

Coolest thing in your cubicle or office?

I have a toy octopus (knit and stuffed) by my desk. One day I came to work to find a “Minion” button attached to him, and an “Evil Overlord” button on my desk for me. The octopus and I agreed that the buttons were misaligned to our roles, and switched.

What is your guilty pleasure?

I’ll admit to follow @emergencyKittens on Twitter, but nothing more!

Career advice – what’s your top tip?

Do what makes you happy. If it doesn’t make you happy, then find something else that does. Changing careers or employers can be intimidating, but also an exhilarating experience.

What useless skill(s) do you possess?

Oh, so very many. I don’t seem to use my Medieval Latin paleography skills much any more. I haven’t sewn nicely tailored jackets in years. I don’t recall the last time I worked a machine lathe either.

Proudest moment in your professional life?

I think I get the biggest swell of pride every time I see one of my staff (or students) make a personal breakthrough for themselves. I really like to help others find new approaches to their work and open their eyes to new possibilities. When I see them come back to me to show off their work, it’s always a thrill.

If you had 24 hours all to yourself, how would you best like to spend it?

Probably wandering quietly alone in some breathtakingly beautiful and secluded spot by the ocean (though any large body of water would do).

If you didn’t work in the information industry, what would you be doing?

I guess there’s a possibility that I might still be teaching, but a slim one. I’m beginning to wonder more and more if I ought not to be working in the tech sector where innovation is highly prized.

Finish this sentence: “In high school, I would have been voted the person most likely to … “

Ha! The only thing I could come up with for this was not suitable for print. Thankfully, an old high school friend of mine suggested “most likely to die in a laughing fit.” I’m cool with that.

How do you stay current in your field?

I spend a lot of time listening to others: conferences and professional associations, area meetings, departmental meetings, interest groups, Twitter. These are all great ways for keeping an ear to the ground and staying apprised of what others are doing around you. I like meetings rather more than most people. Successful meetings, that is. Useful meetings, where things get done collaboratively.

The field of education and teaching is constantly in flux from curriculum to funding, from technologies to staffing. What opportunities does the frequency of change, for better or for worse, present to the library community and to users?

From a systems perspective I suppose the greatest opportunity the frequency of change provides is the opportunity to fail. We are making so many changes so quickly that there’s really no other option. Failure doesn’t have to be just for the worse, though. Embracing failure gives you the freedom to take risks; to try something new, and to accept that it might or might not work out. If it works, that’s great. If it doesn’t, try again. Nothing we build lasts forever anyway; it all has to be rebuilt at one time or another.

The effect of our users and community is no different. We can’t keep counting on the tried and true, and the future is unknown. Innovation is a necessity, and if you don’t take risks then you won’t get stuff done.

What should every information professional know about school librarianship?

I wonder how many information professionals think about the librarians and library technicians that toil in the background to make school libraries work effectively. Most students and teachers in the schools only see the front-facing teacher-librarians, and don’t imagine the team of cataloguers, systems librarians, acquisitions people, shippers and receivers, web developers, trainers, and everyone else that work in the central offices to hold everything together and to make our teacher-librarians look good in their schools.

Biggest surprise working in this sector?

Probably my biggest discovery was how widely varied my day to day work is, and how many different types of tasks there are to be done.

What would you like your headstone to read?

I do not want to have a headstone, or any kind of memorial for that matter. If I had to have one, though, I suppose it should read, “died in a laughing fit.”

Posted in 13 Questions, People, School libraries | Leave a Comment »

Call for Nominations: 2015 CLA Advancement of Intellectual Freedom in Canada Award

Posted by CLA Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-10-26

The CLA Intellectual Freedom Advisory Committee is now seeking nominations for the 2015 CLA Advancement of Intellectual Freedom in Canada Award.

The deadline for submissions is Friday, November 14, 2014.

This award recognizes and honours outstanding contributions to intellectual freedom in Canada by individuals or groups. Preference is given to librarians, other library workers, and library institutions. However like-minded individuals such as teachers or authors and groups such as schools, publishers or writers groups are also eligible.

The general criteria for judging candidates for the award are as follows:

  • individuals and institutions having demonstrated leadership and courage in defending and promoting the principles of intellectual freedom in Canada; or,
  • individuals and institutions having demonstrated leadership and courage in resisting censorship and in opposing violations of intellectual freedom pressures in Canada; or,
  • individuals and institutions having produced innovative and creative projects, programs, or materials that promote the principles of intellectual freedom in Canada.

The award will be presented at a special event in February 2015 as part of the Freedom to Read Week celebrations in Toronto, Ontario. The event is organized by the Book and Periodical Council, with the participation of CLA and The Writers Union of Canada.

For more information on how to nominate an individual, group or institution:

Posted in Awards, Intellectual freedom | Leave a Comment »

Recent Statements from the Canadian Library Association

Posted by CLA Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-10-25

Over the past few months, the Canadian Library Association has issued a number of statements on topics of interest to the Canadian library and information management community:

Adobe Digital Editions and Transmission of Unencrypted Data

Broadband

Census

Copyright

Cyberbullying

Library and Archives Canada

National Union Catalogue

Open Government

Print Disabled

Prisons

Privacy

Statistics Canada

Trans-Pacific Partnership

 

Posted in Library and Archives Canada, Copyright, Access to information, Advocacy, Open government, Open data | Leave a Comment »

Infographic: How To Write Better Emails

Posted by CLA Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-10-23

Posted in Infographics | Leave a Comment »

 
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