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Truth and Reconciliation Commission: Calls to Action for the Information Community

Posted by Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2015-06-02

June 2, 2015

OTTAWA – The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada released its findings and calls to action today, following a six year mandate where the three Commissioners heard more than 6,750 survivor and witness statements from across the country after over a century of abuse at Indian Residential Schools.

The 94 calls to action represent the first step toward redressing the legacy of Indian Residential Schools and advancing the process of reconciliation, said the Honourable Justice Murray Sinclair, chair of the TRC.

“Starting now, we all have an opportunity to show leadership, courage and conviction in helping heal the wounds of the past as we make a path towards a more just, more fair and more loving country,” said Sinclair.

The calls to action include ones focused on the information management community:

Museums and Archives

67. We call upon the federal government to provide funding to the Canadian Museums Association to undertake, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, a national review of museum policies and best practices to determine the level of compliance with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and to make recommendations.

68. We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, and the Canadian Museums Association to mark the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation in 2017 by establishing a dedicated national funding program for commemoration projects on the theme of reconciliation.

69. We call upon Library and Archives Canada to:

i. Fully adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the United Nations   Joinet-Orentlicher Principles, as related to Aboriginal peoples’ inalienable right to know the truth about what happened and why, with regard to human rights violations committed against them in residential schools.

ii. Ensure that its record holdings related to residential schools are accessible to the public.

iii. Commit more resources to its public education materials and programming on residential schools.

70. We call upon the federal government to provide funding to the Canadian Association of Archivists to undertake, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, a national review of archival policies and best practices to:

i. Determine the level of compliance with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the United Nations Joinet-Orentlicher Principles, as related to Aboriginal peoples’ inalienable right to know the truth about what happened and why, with regard to human rights violations committed against them in residential schools.

ii. Produce a report with recommendations for full implementation of these international mechanisms as a reconciliation framework for Canadian archives.

Missing Children and Burial Information

71. We call upon all chief coroners and provincial vital statistics agencies that have not provided to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada their records on the deaths of Aboriginal children in the care of residential school authorities to make these documents available to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.

72. We call upon the federal government to allocate sufficient resources to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation to allow it to develop and maintain the National Residential School Student Death Registry established by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.

73. We call upon the federal government to work with churches, Aboriginal communities and former residential schools students to establish and maintain an online registry of residential school cemeteries, including where possible, plot maps showing the location of deceased residential school children.

74. We call upon the federal government to work with the churches and Aboriginal community leaders to inform the families of children who died at residential schools of the child’s burial location, and to respond to families wishes for appropriate commemoration ceremonies and markers, and reburial in home communities where requested.

75. We call upon the federal government to work with provincial, territorial, and municipal government, churches, Aboriginal communities, former residential school students, and current landowners to develop and implement strategies and procedures for the ongoing identification, documentation, maintenances, commemoration, and protection of residential school cemeteries or other sites at which residential school children were buried. This is to include the provision of appropriate memorial ceremonies and commemorative markers to honour the deceased children.

76. We call upon the parties engaged in the work of documenting, maintaining, commemorating, and protecting residential school cemeteries to adopt strategies in accordance with the following principles:

i. The Aboriginal community most affected shall lead he development of such strategies.

ii. Information shall be sought from residential school Survivors and other Knowledge Keepers in the development of such strategies.

iii. Aboriginal protocols shall be respected before any potentially invasive technical inspection and investigation of a cemetery site.

National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation

77. We call upon provincial, territorial, municipal, and community archives to work collaboratively with the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation to identify and collect copies of all records relevant to the history and legacy of the residential school system, and to provide these to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.

78. We call upon the Government of Canada to commit to making a funding contribution of $10 million over seven years to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, plus an additional amount to assist communities to research and produce histories of their own residential school experience and their involvement in truth, healing, and reconciliation.

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Highlights from Budget 2015

Posted by Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2015-04-21

Finance Minister Joe Oliver today tabled the 2015 federal budget. Below are some highlights of interest to the Canadian library community:

Canada150

Supporting activities and events to celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary in 2017, with $210 million over four years, starting in 2015–16.

In 2017, Canada will mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation. This milestone will provide an opportunity to celebrate Canada’s history, heritage, values and future. To mark this event, Economic Action Plan 2015 proposes to provide $210 million over four years, starting in 2015–16, to support activities, events and celebrations across Canada.

Funding will be used to support local community events such as festivals and concerts, enhanced Canada Day celebrations in the National Capital Region and other major Canadian cities, and other national initiatives, such as Rendez-vous naval 2017, that will unite Canadians from coast to coast to coast.

Creating a new dedicated infrastructure fund to support the renovation, expansion and improvement of existing community infrastructure in all regions of the country as part of the Canada 150 celebrations.

Economic Action Plan 2015 proposes to create a new dedicated infrastructure fund to support the renovation, expansion and improvement of existing community infrastructure in all regions of the country. These new investments, which will be cost-shared with municipalities, community organizations and not-for-profit entities, will support projects that celebrate our shared heritage, create jobs and improve the quality of life of Canadians from coast to coast to coast. The Government will announce further details on the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program over the coming months.

Copyright

Introducing amendments to the Copyright Act that will enable Canada to implement and accede to the Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired or Otherwise Print Disabled.

The ability to access printed information is essential to prepare for and participate in Canada’s economy, society and job market. According to Statistics Canada, approximately 1 million Canadians live with blindness or partial sight. The Government will propose amendments to the Copyright Act to implement and accede to the Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired or Otherwise Print Disabled (the Marrakesh Treaty). Aligning Canada’s copyright limitations and exceptions with the international standard established by the Marrakesh Treaty would enable Canada to accede to this international agreement. Once the treaty is in force, as a member country, Canadians would benefit from greater access to adapted materials.

Proposing changes to the Copyright Act to extend the term of protection of sound recordings and performances.

The mid-1960s were an exciting time in Canadian music, producing many iconic Canadian performers and recordings. While songwriters enjoy the benefits flowing from their copyright throughout their lives, some performers are starting to lose copyright protection for their early recordings and performances because copyright protection for song recordings and performances following the first release of the sound recording is currently provided for only 50 years.

Economic Action Plan 2015 proposes to amend the Copyright Act to extend the term of protection of sound recordings and performances from 50 to 70 years following the first release of the sound recording. This will ensure that performers and record labels are fairly compensated for the use of their music for an additional 20 years.

Modernize Canada’s intellectual property framework to help innovators better protect their intellectual property.

Building on these measures, Economic Action Plan 2015 proposes to further modernize Canada’s intellectual property framework to keep pace with internationally recognized best practices. The Government will propose amendments to the Patent Act, Trade-marks Act and Industrial Design Act to provide intellectual property agents with a statutory privilege for confidential communications with clients, enhancing Canada as a place in which to invent and market inventions. This measure will bring Canada’s framework in line with other common law countries such as Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. Amendments will also be proposed to modernize administrative practices and increase clarity and legal certainty for businesses. For example, proposed amendments would provide the Canadian Intellectual Property Office with the ability to extend key deadlines in cases of force majeure events such as floods or ice storms.

Education

Investing $2 million over two years, starting in 2016–17, to expand the Computers for Schools program, extending access to refurbished computer equipment to non-profit organizations such as those that support low-income Canadians, seniors and new Canadians.

Recognizing the important social and environmental benefits of this successful program, Economic Action Plan 2015 proposes to provide $2 million over two years, starting in 2016–17, to expand the Computers for Schools program and extend access to refurbished computer equipment to a wider group of not-for-profit organizations, including those that support low-income Canadians, seniors and new Canadians. The program will be renamed to reflect its expansion to enable more Canadians to fully participate in the digital economy.

Providing $200 million over five years, starting in 2015–16, to improve First Nations education.

Earning a high school diploma is an important achievement that opens the door to a range of education, training and work opportunities. Economic Action Plan 2015 proposes to provide $200 million over five years, starting in 2015–16, to help support First Nations to achieve better education outcomes, including building partnerships with provincial school systems. The proposed investment in the Strong Schools, Successful Students Initiative will support the First Nation Student Success Program and the Education Partnerships Program.

Infrastructure

Creating a new dedicated infrastructure fund to support the renovation, expansion and improvement of existing community infrastructure in all regions of the country as part of the Canada 150 celebrations.

Economic Action Plan 2015 proposes to create a new dedicated infrastructure fund to support the renovation, expansion and improvement of existing community infrastructure in all regions of the country. These new investments, which will be cost-shared with municipalities, community organizations and not-for-profit entities, will support projects that celebrate our shared heritage, create jobs and improve the quality of life of Canadians from coast to coast to coast. The Government will announce further details on the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program over the coming months.

Research

Providing an additional $1.33 billion over six years, starting in 2017–18, to the Canada Foundation for Innovation to support advanced research infrastructure at universities, colleges and research hospitals.

The Canada Foundation for Innovation is a not-for-profit corporation that supports the modernization of research infrastructure at universities, colleges, research hospitals and other not-for-profit research institutions across Canada. Through the Foundation, the Government invests with other partners in state-of-the-art facilities and equipment that play a crucial role in attracting and retaining the world’s top minds, training the next generation of researchers and supporting private sector innovation.

To date, the Foundation has committed more than $6.2 billion in support for over 8,880 projects at 144 research institutions in 69 municipalities across Canada. These contributions, along with those from institutions and their partners, have resulted in a total investment of almost $14 billion in Canadian research infrastructure since the Foundation’s creation.

Economic Action Plan 2015 proposes to provide an additional $1.33 billion to the Foundation over six years, starting in 2017–18. This investment will strengthen Canada’s capacity for highly competitive research and technology development by supporting advanced research equipment and facilities, including digital research infrastructure; industry-relevant research infrastructure at colleges through the College-Industry Innovation Fund; and the ongoing operations and maintenance needs of national research facilities. This additional funding underscores the Government’s continued commitment to investing in research excellence in Canada.

Creating a more efficient and effective national digital research infrastructure system by providing $105 million over five years, starting in 2015–16, to CANARIE, Canada’s world-class high-speed research and education network.

As Canada’s national ultra-high-speed backbone network, CANARIE enables data-intensive, leading-edge research and big science across Canada and around the world. Researchers in academic institutions, major science facilities and federal labs use CANARIE to maximize the impact of their findings by disseminating knowledge and collaborating effectively in national and international research projects. CANARIE also benefits entrepreneurs and small businesses by providing access to cloud resources that can help to accelerate product development and sharpen their competitive edge in the global marketplace.

Economic Action Plan 2015 proposes to provide $105 million over five years, starting in 2015–16, for CANARIE to continue to support the operations of Canada’s ultra-high-speed research network. Funding will support the evolution of the network to meet growing demand and ensure it will continue to support world-class research collaborations across the country and internationally.

Dedicating an additional $46 million per year to the granting councils, starting in 2016–17, focused in areas that will fuel economic growth and respond to important challenges and opportunities.

To strengthen the research capacity of post-secondary institutions and support their growing interactions with the private sector, Economic Action Plan 2015 proposes to provide an additional $46 million in 2016–17 and ongoing to the granting councils focused in areas that will fuel economic growth and respond to important challenges and opportunities, as follows:

  • $15 million per year to the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, of which $10 million per year is directed to collaborations between companies and researchers from universities and colleges under the new consolidated suite of similar business innovation programs (as described below in the section entitled “Strengthening the Delivery of Business Innovation Programs”). This new funding will target research areas such as natural resources and energy, advanced manufacturing, and environment and agriculture. The balance of $5 million per year will be directed to industry-driven research initiatives at Canada’s polytechnics and colleges through the College and Community Innovation Program (see below). The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council will also continue to support collaborative research in the automotive, manufacturing, forest and fishing industries, further to the direction and resources provided in Budget 2008.
  • $7 million per year to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council for its Partnership Grants, which support collaborations between academic researchers, businesses and other partners to advance research and knowledge mobilization in the social sciences and humanities.
  • $15 million per year to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, of which $13 million is for the expansion of the Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research, to advance health care innovation in partnership with provincial governments, research institutions, and the private and not-for-profit sectors, with a view to increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of the health care system. The balance of $2 million per year will support additional research to better understand and address the health challenges posed by anti-microbial resistant infections.
  • $9 million per year to the Research Support Fund to support the indirect costs borne by post-secondary institutions in undertaking federally sponsored research.

Colleges and polytechnics play an important role in helping small and medium-sized enterprises bring new technologies, products and processes to the marketplace. As indicated above, Economic Action Plan 2015 includes an additional $5 million annually for the College and Community Innovation Program starting in 2016–17, increasing its budget to $55 million per year. This program supports collaboration between colleges and industry on research and development projects that focus on company needs, helping firms to become more innovative and productive.

Enhance Canada’s research capacity through investments in transformative infrastructure projects that enable world-class research and enrich Canada’s research landscape

Development of a Digital Research Infrastructure Strategy that includes new policies on research data management and storage and a coordinated long-term approach to the funding and provision of networking, high-performance computing, and software tools. A new Digital Research Infrastructure Strategy will promote coordination among the federal agencies involved in the delivery of digital research infrastructure and will help to optimize the following new Economic Action Plan 2015 investments in digital research infrastructure.

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Information Management Priorities in the 2015-16 Reports on Plans and Priorities

Posted by Cabot Yu on 2015-04-06

On March 31, 2015, Tony Clement, President of the Treasury Board, tabled the 2015-16 Reports on Plans and Priorities for 84 government departments and agencies.

In addition to providing details about the program priorities for each department and agency, the RPPs also identify priorities for their internal services.

Below are the information management related priorities as identified by individual departments and agencies.


Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Canadian Polar Commission

  • Implement the approved Information Management and Information Technology (IM/IT) Strategy, including enhanced governance over IM/IT initiatives and associated funding, which will enable the Department to effectively prioritize projects and other IM/IT initiatives;
  • Identify and assess opportunities for implementing and maturing Enterprise Information Architecture and Enterprise Information Management practices to provide the framework and integrated process to support departmental operations and initiatives

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

  • The Department will continue to adopt and enhance information management and information technology solutions to advance the discovery, collaboration and safeguarding of business information and knowledge within the Department and with its partners. It will also continue to support the Government of Canada’s consolidation and standardization agenda with its work on web renewal, migration to a common email platform, application readiness for data-centre migration, and planning for the human- and financial-resource systems managed by the federal government.

Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

  • Continued implementation of electronic document management;
  • Intensified use of social media to maintain contact with economic development organizations and citizens in the interest of communication;
  • Implementation of innovative approaches to information management and information technology, through maximized use of the data warehouse, dashboards and automated reports for decision-making and reporting

Canada Revenue Agency

  • Integrity and security
    • The Agency will enhance the protection of personal information it holds through the continued implementation of its privacy action plan. This includes the implementation of the highest levels of security protocols for data transfers and an Agency-wide plan to ensure privacy impacts are identified and addressed each time the CRA launches a new program or activity.
    • The CRA will continue to strengthen privacy protections for internal applications and secure services to taxpayers. In the face of evolving threats, the CRA’s vigilant protection of Canadians’ tax information and electronic services will be assured through ongoing projects to advance identity and access management and through the National Audit Trail System (to be fully implemented by March 2017).
  • Access to information and privacy
    • The CRA is enhancing the protection of personal information held by the Agency through the timely implementation of its privacy action plan developed in fiscal 2013-2014. This plan outlines actions the Agency will take to strengthen privacy oversight and practices at the CRA. Some of the key activities in the action plan include the implementation of an Agency-wide privacy impact assessment action plan, which will ensure privacy risks are adequately addressed in the development of new programs and services, and the use of the Audit Trail Record Analysis Tool (ATRAT), which enhances the CRA’s ability to monitor access to taxpayer information by its employees.
    • The CRA is taking immediate action to enhance the protection of personal information and privacy within its ATIP operations. Near-term actions will focus on three broad areas: operational processes, communications/training, and accountabilities. Actions will include:
      • Implementing encryption for electronic transmission of documents.
      • Enhancing existing requirements for securing all Agency documents containing personal information through the use of identifying marks clearly communicating to employees which documents contain protected information and must be managed accordingly.
      • Establishing quality assurance officers in all ATIP offices who are dedicated to verifying the accuracy and transmission information for all document packages. This will add additional, independent oversight of contents and use of security procedures.
      • Raising the accountabilities and authorities granted under the Access to Information Act to ensure senior managers are directly engaged in decisions on the treatment and disclosure of personal information.
      • The CRA is committed to continually enhancing its ability to protect taxpayer information, taking immediate action where there is inappropriate disclosure or access, and meeting its legislative requirements under the Privacy Act. The Agency will do so while managing a steadily increasing volume of requests which, in recent years, consistently rank it in the top three of all government departments and agencies. In 2013-14, the CRA received 2,751 requests and processed 1,636,782 pages. This is almost 400,000 more pages than the organisation ranked second.

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

  • Monitor and reinforce compliance with the Policy on Government Security and the Privacy Act and requirements outlined in the Treasury Board Secretariat’s notice on Secure Use of Portable Data Storage Devices and the Directive on Privacy Practices;
  • Integrate and modernize information technology systems and information management practices to more efficiently support EA and Aboriginal consultation processes, by partnering with Public Works and Government Services Canada in its Shared Case Management System;
  • Upgrade the Agency’s electronic document and records management system to the government-wide standard, GCDOCS;
  • Transition the Agency’s online content to Canada.ca through the Web Renewal Initiative; and
  • Implement a social media strategy for the Agency.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

  • The CFIA’s transparency agenda is part of the CFIA’s ongoing transformation to be more service-oriented, responsive and accountable organization and aligns with the new requirements under Open Government and organizational changes under Agency Transformation. In 2015-2016 the Agency will review its own experience and key considerations to develop an approach for its next phase of Transparency. This will include:
    • Considering the approaches taken by its international partners and aligning CFIA’s practices with international standards.
    • Engaging and consulting with stakeholders on the Agency’s approach to transparency and Open Government.

Canadian Heritage

  • Implement the Government of Canada web renewal initiative by initiating the migration of the Department web content to the Canada.ca website within the theme “Culture, History and Sport.”
  • Strengthen the Department’s Record Keeping capacity by initiating the Government of Canada Electronic Document Record Management solution, GCDOCS, to provide Department-wide information lifecycle management and the ability to collect, store, share, organize, manage, and search content.

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

  • The Tribunal will launch a new IM system for its corporate documents. The new system allows more efficient retention and disposal of documents and improves access to corporate documents. In conjunction, an awareness campaign will be conducted to enhance the adoption rate of this new system.
  • In response to users’ feedback, the Tribunal will make its Web site more accessible, relevant and user-friendly by facilitating navigation to find content related to each area of its mandate. The redesigned Web site will also feature new sections that provide recent developments and updated guidelines.

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

  • Prepare for the migration to the government-wide email and document management systems.
  • Continue to strengthen external communications and outreach efforts, making greater use of its updated website and consider new tools to offer increased and improved information to clients about CanNor’s programs and services, and about economic development in the North.

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

  • The CRTC will pursue a redesign of its website to enable Canadians to find information more easily and communicate more effectively with the Commission.
  • To support the Government of Canada’s Open Government initiative, the CRTC will take steps to provide greater public access to CRTC data.

Canadian Space Agency

  • The CSA will implement its three-year information management and information technology strategy. This strategy aims to manage effectively and efficiently all operational information assets, and the organization’s IT applications, according to their life cycle, to support all employees as part of their duties.

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

  • Continue to upgrade departmental information technology applications to adapt to new service delivery models and better manage information.

Employment and Social Development Canada

  • Information is recognized as an important and strategic asset. A large share of organizational resources is devoted to the effective storage, retrieval and maintenance of information. This information provides the capability to deliver services, make better decisions and improve performance. At the same time, the responsible management and protection of information is fundamental to everything the Department does. ESDC manages more of the personal information of Canadians than any other organization in Canada and is committed to meeting the highest standards of respect for the privacy rights of Canadians and the protection of their personal information.
  • Good information management practices are critical to the continued effectiveness and improvement of the organization as well as to the privacy and security of personal information. Multi-year planning and decision-making informed by business and predictive analytics and performance information are needed to ensure that information resources can be leveraged to identify opportunities and to provide enhanced support for decision-making. In addition, the Department needs to ensure that the private/sensitive information under its control is safeguarded, that best practices are in place to protect personal and sensitive information and that record keeping practices comply with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Record Keeping directive.
  • What are the plans for meeting this priority?
    • Full implementation of the Electronic Documents and Records Management Solutions (EDRMS)
    • Continue the implementation of the Privacy Management Action Plan that supports the continuous improvement of controls and practices related to sensitive information
    • Improve departmental security including implementing the Information Technology Security Plan that will result in more robust controls and preventative measures to protect against cyber threats
    • Advance the e-Payroll Information Service

Department of Finance Canada

  • The Department of Finance Canada will pursue improvements in its information management (IM) and information technology (IT) infrastructure and services to ensure that its IT platform is robust and that IM services are effective, and to allow IM and IT, including security considerations, to be managed in a manner that addresses business requirements.
  • In addition, the Department will implement its departmental Information Management Strategy to strengthen IM practices, including electronic information management, and will continue to work toward full implementation in 2015 of the Treasury Board Directive on Recordkeeping.
  • The Department will continue to support the implementation of, and monitor progress on, government-wide transformation activities in the areas of IM and IT, including security.

Department of Justice Canada

  • The Department will continue to implement its Information@Justice Strategy to modernize information practices, adopting a digital standard and supporting business transformation through innovative ways to manage information. The Department will also work closely with partners, such as the Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada and Shared Services Canada (SSC) in implementing the Government of Canada Information Management /Information Technology Modernization Agenda to improve efficiency in areas including cyber security, Email Transformation Initiative, telecommunications transformation, the adoption of common systems, including case management, and the migration of responsibilities to SSC for the provision of end-user software and hardware (workplace technology devices).

Environment Canada

  • Develop a departmental action plan on Open Government while continuing work underway to strengthen data management and recordkeeping practices and capacity.
  • Lead the development of the “Environment and Natural Resources” theme on Canada.ca in support of the Government-wide directive on web renewal, which will make the Government of Canada more efficient and responsive to Canadians.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre

  • Continue to enhance personnel, physical, and information security programs in order to protect information, assets, and services against compromise.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

  • Implementing the Email Transformation Initiative and migrating to consolidated Government of Canada websites;
  • Continue to effectively manage the Department’s web presence to ensure an integrated approach to delivering services and information to Canadians and stakeholders that are client-focussed, cost-effective and will ensure a successful migration to a single Government of Canada site.

Health Canada

  • Implement the Government of Canada’s Web Renewal Action Plan, which includes alignment and consolidation of internet content and external web applications to Canada.ca templates.

Immigration and Refugee Board

  • The Board will ensure that information technology and information management practices are aligned with Treasury Board policies, to the extent practicable and appropriate given the IRB’s status as a quasi-judicial tribunal.

Industry Canada

  • Another focus for the Department in 2015–16 will be the continuing implementation of Government of Canada transformation initiatives in information technology and information management through participation in initiatives such as Open Government, GCDocs and the Email Transformation Initiative.

Infrastructure Canada

  • Continue to improve and update our public website with information for Canadians and stakeholders
  • Invest in the direct support of the activities of its programs. These investments will largely focus on enhancing the Program Information Management System (PIMS) to support the delivery of the new infrastructure programs such as the New Building Canada Fund and the renewed Gas Tax Fund.
  • Continue to support whole-of-government initiatives related to information technology (IT) modernization in areas such as policy renewal and changes in the provision of services for email, telephones, documents management, end user devices and software.

Library and Archives Canada

  • Development of regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools
    • Expedite the issuance of disposition instruments to federal institutions that are subject to the Library and Archives of Canada Act to give them comprehensive disposition coverage.
    • Continue negotiations with federal institutions that are not subject to the Library and Archives of Canada Act to ensure sound recordkeeping.
  • Collaboration in the management of government records
    • Continue to support Government of Canada departments and agencies by developing recordkeeping tools and by providing advice and guidance to federal institutions on sound disposition and recordkeeping practices.
    • Continue to collaborate with Government of Canada departments and agencies and with central agencies to plan for the increase in digital volume and to establish LAC’s needs.
    • Continue to implement the new storage model for government information resources, according to which LAC collaborates with departments and agencies to help them dispose of their records of business value that are stored in regional centres.
    • Develop and implement a directive that will include detailed requirements to support government institutions. This commitment is in line with the initiatives of an open government, which recommends that federal government institutions minimize access restrictions to their information resources of enduring value before transferring them to LAC.
    • Provide leadership in government-wide recordkeeping and information management initiatives as follows:
      • LAC will continue to participate in the Arctic Council’s activities to establish policies and training tools for the archival system for standard records, which will improve the management of and access to these records. (The Arctic Council is an international organization composed of eight countries, including Canada which has assumed the chairmanship from 2013 to 2015; the Council’s chairmanship will be transferred to the United States in 2015.)
      • LAC will play an active role in revising the ISO 15489 standard on records management.
      • LAC will co-chair, in partnership with the Treasury Board Secretariat, symposiums, training sessions and discussions on recordkeeping and information management.
  • Documentation of Canadian society
    • Continue acquiring documentary heritage that is relevant to Canadians.
    • Finish, by the end of 2015, processing the backlog of government records that have accumulated since being transferred by other departments and agencies, and take the necessary measures to prevent this type of situation from recurring. The elimination of the backlog will enable Canadians to research government records of national interest.
    • Clear the private archives processing backlog to make those archives discoverable.
    • Continue with web harvesting so that key events and topics of interest to Canadians are documented for current and future generations.
    • Develop and implement an action plan to acquire records from parliamentarians following the 2015 federal election.
    • Continue developing and renewing all evaluation and acquisition framework policies.
  • Stewardship of documentary heritage
    • Continue to advance the strategy for migrating audiovisual content and digital media stored on obsolete formats to current digital formats to ensure content preservation and accessibility.
    • Pursue mass digitization projects, in collaboration with partners, for microfilms and content related to the First World War.
    • Increase efforts to restore, preserve and digitize the collection in analogue format.
    • Continue to develop and implement the long-term infrastructure plan to meet the institution’s future needs for preservation space.
    • Continue to renew the stewardship policy suite and develop a directive on digitization.
  • Access to documentary heritage
    • Provide greater access to documentary heritage through digitization initiatives, an increase in online content and in the number of online search aids, joint exhibitions, and quality services facilitating access to information resources.
    • Enhance the visibility of the collection by holding public events in collaboration with other memory institutions that share LAC’s vision.
    • Contribute to events such as the commemoration of the centenary of the First World War and the celebration of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation in 2017.
    • Continue to share content on LAC’s social networks, namely through the blog, podcasts, Flickr, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, to reach as many clients as possible and to make the collection discoverable through a wide range of distribution channels.
    • Renew the national database, which contains over 25 million bibliographic records, so that it can leverage new technological advances and better meet the needs of clients and the Canadian library community.
    • Contribute to Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government by providing open data sets, by ensuring that access restrictions to records in its collection are lifted, and by helping to develop the Government of Canada’s virtual library.
  • Internal services
    • Develop a digital strategy for the entire institution to facilitate the transition to an integrated digital environment, which will ensure the continuity of the digital collection and make it easier to access.
    • Develop and implement a long-term infrastructure strategy that meets space requirements for preservation and services. This strategy will show LAC’s desire to consolidate and streamline its record storage spaces.
    • Provide the support and guidance needed to develop skills that will enable LAC to be a leading institution in documentary heritage management.
    • Review all of LAC’s organizational functions to simplify rules and optimize processes in order to maximize effectiveness and efficiency.
    • Develop LAC’s 2016–19 business plan, taking into account consultations with its partners.

Military Police Complaints Commission

  • The MPCC’s Internal Services will continuously find innovative ways to ensure programs and services meet the operational demands of the Complaints Resolution Program and central agency requirements. In addition, the MPCC plans to review and incorporate the Blueprint 2020 throughout the organization by incorporating a sound change management process. This includes a new Enterprise Document and Records Management Solution, implementation of the Common Human Resources Business Process, greening opportunities, etc.

National Defence

  • Defence will comply with the Treasury Board Secretariat Record Keeping Directive.

National Energy Board

  • Support Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government
  • Modernize NEB’s record keeping practices and systems

National Research Council

  • NRC will develop and implement a knowledge management strategy that will facilitate the increased research and business value of NRC’s knowledge and information assets.

Natural Resources Canada

  • The Department will identify opportunities for the integration of requirements from the Open Government Directive into NRCan’s S&T policies and reporting.
  • The Access to Information and Privacy program (ATIP) secretariat will continue to develop and implement renewed procedures to transition to increased electronic processes for ATIP requests, making full use of electronic repositories, such as the GCDOCS information management system.
  • NRCan will continue to implement the Government of Canada’s Web Renewal Initiative in accordance with direction from the Treasury Board Secretariat.
  • As the department continues to implement key government-wide initiatives such as the Performance Management program for employees and GCDOCS, it will focus its first full year post implementation on change management and improving performance.

Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs Canada

  • Develop and implement an IM Plan, which includes an IM file structure, a document management tool, and retention and disposition procedures and schedules.

Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying

  • Finalize and implement an information management strategy for the organization.

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

  • Explore opportunities to further streamline or simplify business processes. Possible areas of process review may include staff arrival and departure, budget management, information management system, as well as management and oversight.
  • Integrate government-approved case management software into OCOL’s enterprise information management platform and adopt technology tools to help employees work more effectively, as the organization’s needs evolve.

Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner

  • focus on supporting the office’s transformation efforts in response to government-wide initiatives addressing email, recordkeeping and web renewal

Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada

  • Complete the implementation of mitigation strategies to improve the safeguarding of key assets (people, information and goods) through innovative and sound approaches.
  • Implement the recommendations from the internal audit of the governance of IM/IT;
  • Make enhancements to the Office’s new research tool (i.e., the Knowledge Centre); and,
  • Design a tool that will enable secure electronic collaboration and file-sharing between the OPC and external partners as well as investigation complainants and respondents.

Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions

  • Assessing the Government of Canada’s (GoC) Shared IT Services programs and services and integrating them with OSFI’s information management and technology (IM/IT) requirements and plans.
  • Pursuing the implementation of the Enterprise Information Management program to enhance the management of OSFI’s information assets and comply with applicable legislation and GoC policies and directives.
  • Continuing to improve the governance of data provided by FRFIs and pension plans as well as data management processes to ensure accurate and timely analysis for FISC partners, while minimizing burden on filers and OSFI.

Parks Canada Agency

  • identify information resources of business value and required controls for the effective management, sharing and use of information, and develop Recordkeeping action plans for each Parks Canada business unit that address specific Recordkeeping compliance activities, such as the clean-up of legacy information resources;

Privy Council Office

  • enhance digital recordkeeping and information use and sharing practices across the department, and support ongoing compliance with the Government of Canada policy framework and strategy for information management;
  • support the Government of Canada’s efforts to modernize information technology through: enhancements to end user services; the Email Transformation Initiative; the establishment of government-wide secure network connectivity; and the consolidation of data centres, which include enterprise applications;

Public Service Commission

  • Continuing to support corporate projects such as the Integration of IT services to Shared Services Canada, rationalization of business applications, implementation of a common e-mail system, a Performance Management initiative and Government of Canada Web Renewal.

Public Works and Government Services Canada

  • Implement electronic revision of texts for publication in The Canada Gazette.
  • Launch the new Research Information Management System to provide government departments and agencies with access to an updated database of contracted public opinion research projects.
  • Develop tools and services to enable client departments and agencies to seamlessly transition to the new Government of Canada media planning and buying services model established by the Department.
  • Maintain its focus on improving Document Imaging Services in order to increase cost-efficiency and help client departments and agencies reduce the need to store large volumes of paper documents and decrease their operational costs.
  • Continue to pursue the integration of GCDOCS, the Government of Canada enterprise record management solution, with our document imaging solutions.
  • Explore options for leveraging private-sector capacity to consolidate federal government requirements for document imaging services, such that government can obtain volume pricing advantages and ensure consistent compliance with privacy, security, quality and information management requirements.
  • Continue to partner with client organizations to facilitate the roll-out of GCDOCS throughout the Government of Canada.
  • Continue to align Government of Canada initiatives using a common platform whereby departments and agencies benefit from horizontal direction and ongoing application support (e.g., Shared Case Management System).
  • Develop a new Directive on Privacy Practices, including a new Privacy Breach Protocol consistent with related Treasury Board policies.
  • Develop an Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Monitoring Program, with the objective to increase quality control over the entire ATIP process, including interpretation of legislation and application of exemptions.
  • Enhance information management by continuing the deployment of GCDOCS (an Electronic Documents and Records Management system), updating the Record Disposition Authority for all Program Activities, and initiating projects to increasingly move from paper to digital.
  • Support Open Government through the development of the Departmental Open Government Implementation Plan and the release of additional datasets on the Open Data portal.
  • Work collaboratively with partners to maximize the value of technology in support of departmental and Government of Canada modernization initiatives, by leveraging new and emerging information technologies (IT) and strategic sourcing for service improvement. Examples of Government of Canada modernization initiatives include PWGSC’s leadership in establishing and managing common business applications such as My GCHR for personnel management and GCDOCS for document and records management.

Security Intelligence Review Committee

  • SIRC relies heavily on its information resources to effectively fulfill its mandate. The 2015-16 fiscal year will see the organization’s first full year with its new information management system. SIRC will be assessing how the implementation of this new system and corresponding changes in procedures impact on operational effectiveness.

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

  • Implementation of Phase 1 Directive on Open Government: In 2015-16, SHHRC will identify and inventory all internal data sets. This will assist in enabling the Government of Canada to respond in a phased approach to the challenges of making government information more open.

Statistics Canada

  • Responding to the Treasury Board directive on recordkeeping, Statistics Canada is progressing on its five-year project to implement GCDOCS as a corporate electronic document and records management system.

Supreme Court of Canada

  • Continuing the implementation of GCDOCS across the organization to manage documents and records of business value, including closed case-related records.  Re-aligning business processes in the Records Centre to support clients and their information needs.
  • Ensuring that the Office of the Registrar is able to meet its obligations under the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Directive on Recordkeeping and the Directive on Open Government.

Transport Canada

  • Support the Government of Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government by developing a departmental plan that will enable Transport Canada to proactively gather data/information and to make it available to Canadian citizens in usable and accessible formats;
  • Enhance the efficiency and capacity of information management systems to ensure completeness, consistency, reliability and”shareability” of data via the implementation of an integrated Information Management (IM)/Information Technology (IT) strategy that better supports the delivery of our programs and services;

Transportation Safety Board of Canada

  • Reviewing options to expedite the processing of requests under the Access to Information Act in the face of significant increases in the volume of requests, and the volume and complexity of the information covered by the requests. The TSB has temporarily increased the resources dedicated to processing requests in order to assist in this priority area.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

  • Engage Government of Canada information and technology leaders to ensure strategic use of information management (IM) and information technology (IT) in enabling more secure, efficient, and effective enterprise-wide transformation and delivery of government programs and services (ongoing).
  • Modernize the IM and IT portfolio and lead effective execution of strategies to enable efficient, interoperable, accountable, transparent and secure government operations and services in support of the transformation agenda (ongoing).
  • Modernize the administration of the Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) program by developing a government-wide approach to increase efficiency and accessibility by implementing a request and pay online system available through Open.Canada.ca with searchable ATIP summaries (ongoing).
  • Lead Open Government activities by implementing Canada’s second Action Plan on Open Government. This includes providing an Open Government secretariat; working inter-jurisdictionally with provinces and territories; and identifying new initiatives to foster openness, innovation and greater citizen engagement (ongoing).
  • Provide increased access to government data, services and citizen engagement online through a single point of entry, Canada.ca. This web portal has been optimized for mobile use and designed to enhance the user experience. It is also supported by more efficient web publishing (ongoing).
  • Implement initiatives to streamline and automate internal processes, significantly reduce paper usage, and improve efficiencies by using new technologies (ongoing).
  • Introduce new technology, tools and practices for managing information to increase productivity and collaboration and enhance the security of the Secretariat’s information (ongoing).

 

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Auditor General Report on Library and Archives Canada and the Preservation of the Documentary Heritage of the Government of Canada

Posted by Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-11-25

In his Fall 2014 Report tabled today in Parliament, Auditor General Michael Ferguson reports on seven audits which examined a number of different government activities and programs, including the preservation of the documentary heritage of the Government of Canada

Chapter 7 — Documentary Heritage of the Government of Canada—Library and Archives Canada

Highlights

What we examined

The overall objective of the audit was to determine whether Library and Archives Canada has fulfilled its responsibilities for acquiring and preserving government documentary heritage from federal institutions, and for facilitating access to these records for current and future generations.

What we found

Acquisition, preservation, and access

Overall, we found that Library and Archives Canada was not acquiring all the archival records it should from federal institutions. It does not have up-to-date disposition authorities—that specify which records should be transferred and by what date—for all federal institutions. Of those records it had acquired, Library and Archives Canada had a backlog of some 98,000 boxes of government archival records as of April 2014, and does not know when it will be able to complete the processing of these records and facilitate public access to them. This is important because Canadians do not have knowledge of the government’s archival records that have not yet been transferred from the institutions to Library and Archives Canada, nor of records still in Library and Archives Canada’s backlog.

Library and Archives Canada is not acquiring all the archival records it should from federal institutions (see paragraphs 7.12-7.17)

Recommendation. Library and Archives Canada should ensure that disposition authorities of the federal government’s archival records are kept up to date. To accomplish this, it should develop a plan with achievable timelines for issuing and updating the necessary disposition authorities. It should also continue to engage with institutions and to monitor the adequacy of existing disposition authorities.

Library and Archives Canada has a backlog of 98,000 boxes of archival records (see paragraphs 7.18-7.24)

Recommendation. Library and Archives Canada should develop and implement a plan that establishes the approach, resources, budget with cost and efficiency gains estimates, and timelines to eliminate the backlog of government documentary heritage. Results on progress should be measured and reported to management on a regular basis.

Digital readiness

Overall, we found that Library and Archives Canada did not have a corporate digital strategy for the preservation of digital data. In addition, despite having spent $15.4 million on developing and implementing a trusted digital repository from 2006 to 2011, the institution still did not have an integrated system to manage the electronic transfer, preservation, and storage of digital information, and provide digital access to its collection by Canadians.

Library and Archives Canada does not have a corporate digital strategy (see paragraphs 7.29-7.34)

Recommendation. Library and Archives Canada should

  • develop a corporate digital strategy to allow the transition to an integrated digital environment that ensures the sustainability of its digital collection; and
  • continue to engage with institutions to prepare them on how to transfer digital records in an appropriate format, so that it can determine the capacity required to accommodate future digital transfers.

Library and Archives Canada did not use its trusted digital repository (see paragraphs 7.35-7.39)

Recommendation. To support the fulfillment of its mandate, Library and Archives Canada should implement a program that ensures the acquisition and sustainability of digital records, and the provision of access of its collection by Canadians.

Response

Library and Archives Canada agrees with our recommendations, and has responded (see List of Recommendations).

Why we did this audit

Library and Archives Canada serves as the permanent repository of Canada’s documentary heritage, which consists of the federal government’s publications and records of enduring national interest. Library and Archives Canada is responsible for acquiring and preserving records of archival value and for making them available to the public. Its collection includes audiovisual records, photographs, artworks, and electronic documents. The Library and Archives of Canada Act describes Library and Archives Canada as “the continuing memory of the government of Canada and its institutions.”

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Beta Testing of Statistics Canada’s Website

Posted by Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-11-12

Source: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141112/dq141112d-eng.htm

The Daily — Beta testing of Statistics Canada’s website, November 12 to December 12, 2014

Today, Statistics Canada begins testing of a new way to organize its statistical output. The goal is to make sure that Statistics Canada products are user friendly and easy to find on the agency’s website.

As part of a multi-year project to develop a new dissemination model, the agency is inviting users to visit its beta site and provide feedback. The information obtained will be used to develop a more dynamic online presence that is easier to navigate and makes information more readily accessible to a wide range of data users.

Users are invited to rate pages, provide comments and join in the discussion forum. The dialogue between the agency and its users will continue through to December 12. Launch of Statistics Canada’s new website is slated for fall 2015.

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Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government 2.0

Posted by Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-11-06

Source: http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?mthd=index&crtr.page=1&nid=900739

The Government of Canada launched the Action Plan on Open Government 2.0 on November 6, 2014. The Action Plan specifies ways the federal government is working towards creating a more open and transparent government and maximizing the sharing of government information and data. Open Government Action Plan 2.0 consists of 12 commitments, including the foundational commitment, the Directive on Open Government, which will set direction for all activities over the next two years and beyond.

Canada’s first Action Plan on Open Government was launched at the 2012 Open Government Partnership (OGP) Annual Summit in Brazil. Over the last two years, significant progress has been made on a broad range of initiatives to increase access to Open Data, Open Information, and Open Dialogue. This has established a strong foundation on which future open government activities can be built, including new government-wide policy on the release of open data and information, and modern, state-of-the-art platforms to enable public access to government information and engagement opportunities. Key accomplishments include:

  • Next-Generation Open Data: The Government of Canada’s next-generation open data portal (data.gc.ca) was launched in June 2013. This new discovery portal was built based on broad public consultations with users to define new capabilities, and enhancements were made to expand the availability of high-value data, improve data integrity, enrich the usability of the site, facilitate intuitive discovery of data, and increase user engagement.
  • Modernization of Access to Information (ATI) Services: Enhanced online services were launched in 2013 to enable Canadians to search completed ATI requests across all federal departments through a single search interface, and to submit new Access to Information requests via the Web.
  • Open Government License (OGL): In 2013, the Government of Canada issued a new open government license for all levels of government in order to remove barriers to the reuse of published government data and information regardless of origin. This license has been adopted not only by the Government of Canada, but also by several provincial governments and municipalities across the country.
  • Canada.ca: Late last year, the federal government introduced its new government-wide web portal at Canada.ca that provides intuitive navigation features to help Canadians find the information they need more quickly and easily. The portal enables users to quickly complete tasks, and features government-wide search capabilities, better use of social media, and optimized content for mobile devices.
  • Canadian Open Data Experience (CODE): In February 2014, the Government of Canada held the largest competitive open data hackathon in Canadian history, bringing together over 900 developers, students, and open data enthusiasts from across Canada to develop over 100 innovative applications using federal data.

The Directive on Open Government

  • The Directive on Open Government provides guidance on when and how to release Government of Canada data and information of business value. The new Directive on Open Government ensures a consistent approach to releasing information, and applies to more than 100 federal departments and agencies.
  • Other than valid exceptions for privacy, security, and confidentiality, Government of Canada data is to be open by default. Eligible data and information will be released in standardized, open formats, free of charge:
  • The Directive will be implemented over a five-year period to ensure time for departments to meet the requirements. It is a key commitment of the Government of Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government, and was issued on October 9, 2014

Open Data Commitments

Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government 2.0 includes four specific commitments to unlock the economic potential of open data:

1) Open Data Canada

Open Data Canada is intended to harmonize and integrate the diverse range of open data activities happening at all levels of government across Canada, facilitating a “no wrong door” approach to Open Government data, regardless of which Canadian jurisdiction owns it – federal, provincial/territorial, or municipal.

2) Open Data Exchange (ODX)

The Government of Canada is investing $3 million over three years to launch a new institute focused on open data: the Open Data Exchange, or “ODX.” Through ODX, Canadians will be able to see the measurable economic benefits of open data in the form of job creation, investment in data-driven companies, and the establishment of a national hub for the commercialization of open data.

3) Open Data for Development (OD4D)

The OD4D initiative aims to support the global and regional efforts of governments, civil society organizations, and entrepreneurs harnessing Open Data to achieve development outcomes, and enrich the international sharing of open data solutions and best practices. This includes helping to build the capacity of open data initiatives in Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa and Asia, by supporting developing countries as they plan and execute open data initiatives, and create solution-driving networks to bring about social and economic innovation.

4) Open Data Core Commitment

Canada is focused on ensuring high-quality open data services for Canadians by planning a series of projects, including the second Canadian Open Data Experience (CODE2) and the new Open Government Portal, that drive government-wide progress on open data and prioritize easy access to high-value federal data.

Open Information Commitments

Canada’s new Action Plan on Open Government places a strong emphasis on providing Canadians with access to open information. Canada will also work to improve Canadians’ skills as consumers of digital data and information. The six commitments to advance Open Information include:

1) Open Science

The Government of Canada will maximize access to federally-funded scientific research to encourage greater collaboration and engagement with the scientific community, the private sector, and the public.

2) Mandatory Reporting on Extractives

Mandatory reporting standards will increase Canadians’ awareness about how Canadian extractive companies’ revenues are spent, which supports transparency and social responsibility, and helps to combat corruption.

3) Open Contracting

The Government of Canada will coordinate single-window access to a broad range of open contracting information from across federal departments. By improving upon the disclosure of contracting data, the Government of Canada will strengthen the openness and transparency of its procurement processes and increase Canadians’ knowledge of how their tax dollars are being spent.

4) Open Information on Budgets and Expenditures

The Government of Canada will publish expanded information and data on federal spending to help Canadians understand, and hold government accountable for, the use of public monies.

5) Digital Literacy

The Government of Canada will support the development of tools, training resources, and other initiatives to help Canadians acquire the essential skills needed to access, understand, and use digital information and new technologies.

6) Open Government Portal

The Government of Canada will provide robust information management and next-generation search and discovery services on the Open Government portal that will significantly improve the sharing of government information in support of transparency and accountability

Open Dialogue Commitment

As part of Canada’s new Action Plan on Open Government 2.0, the Government of Canada’s open dialogue activities will focus on creating an environment that encourages and enables departments and agencies to regularly consult with Canadian citizens and civil society organizations.

The Government of Canada will provide direction, tools, and resources to enable federal departments and agencies to consult more broadly with citizens and civil society in support of the development and delivery of government policies and programs, through launching a renewed Consulting Canadians site to facilitate easier access to information on federal consultation activities for citizens, as well as a new government-wide consultation portal to promote opportunities for public participation, host online consultations, and share findings from completed consultations.

The government will also develop a set of principles and procedures to guide consultation processes in order to increase the consistency and effectiveness of public consultations across government.

See also:

 

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Information Management Results in the 2013-14 Departmental Performance Reports

Posted by Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-11-05

On November 5, 2014, Tony Clement, President of the Treasury Board, tabled the 2013-14 Departmental Performance Reports for 92 government departments and agencies.

Departmental Performance Reports are a measure of how well individual organizations met their plans and expected results as set out in their respective annual Reports on Plans and Priorities, including those for internal services.

Below are the information management related results as identified by individual departments and agencies. Also provided are the IM-related priorities in the Report on Plans and Priorities for each department and agency.


Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Canadian Polar Commission

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Implement key projects to shift towards an Enterprise Architecture to deliver on three strategic areas: Improved Information Management and Information Technology Governance; Enterprise Information Management; and Project Portfolio Management.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Organizational Priorities

AANDC continued to meet its obligations under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, which includes financial compensation, a Truth and Reconciliation Commission, commemorative activities and measures to support healing and education. With the continued implementation of the Settlement Agreement AANDC has:

  • Completed the disclosure of active, semi-active and legacy documents to the Commission, as well as preparing a plan to research and disclose relevant documents held at Library and Archives Canada.
Sub-Program 2.4.4: Support to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Support to the TRC comprised two elements: document disclosure and participation of government officials at TRC national events.

Canada completed the disclosure of its known “active and semi-active” documents (those in the possession of individual Departments) by September 30, 2013. Disclosure of known “legacy” documents (those held by the Department that speak to the legacy of Indian residential schools rather than to the operation of the schools) was completed by December 2013. Any hitherto unknown historical documents, such as Crown Personnel files, which continue to be identified as part of the IAP process, will be disclosed on an on-going basis.

Canada’s remaining obligation is to disclose its holdings at Library and Archives Canada. This will not be completed by June 30, 2014. The documents held at Library and Archives Canada were not considered relevant until January 30, 2013, when the Ontario Superior Court clarified that the federal government’s obligation to provide all relevant federal documents to the TRC included all documents housed at Library and Archives Canada. Initially, the federal government focused its document disclosure efforts on providing the TRC with all “active and semi-active documents.” Although the TRC also asked the government to provide all relevant federal documents in Library and Archives Canada, the federal interpretation of the Settlement Agreement was that it was only mandated to provide “access” to its archives. This Court case and the decision added unanticipated costs to the sub-program in 2013–2014.

AANDC sought additional financial resources to fund a plan to disclose the documents held at Library and Archives Canada, as this cost had not been previously anticipated.

The challenges of the past year have highlighted that a central coordinating committee is vital to the success of a file this complex. In this case, 24 government departments needed to be engaged in order to complete the work. Without a central working group, this would have been impossible.

Internal Services

Developed an Enterprise Architecture (EA) strategy in line with the Treasury Board Secretariat proposed strategy. Once implemented, EA will enable improved management of information and technology within AANDC.

Canada Border Services Agency

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • The Agency will also take steps to strengthen information technology and information management systems and capacity.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Finally, Information Management (IM) initiatives continued to make progress in 2013–14 with the addition of 4,000 users to Apollo, the Agency’s branding of GCDOCS, the Government of Canada’s standard for all electronic document and records management systems. The Agency also evolved its planning to adopt Shared Services Canada’s new email system and practices. The Apollo implementation will be dovetailed with another business transformation project, the Email Transformation Initiative system. In addition, the Agency has updated its IM Policy and work continues with Library and Archives Canada to further update existing Record Disposition Authorities, specifically information shared between the CBSA and Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

Canada School of Public Service

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • The School will capitalize on opportunities emerging from the Government of Canada’s Open Government Strategy and Recordkeeping Directive by rethinking the design of the School’s data management practices, information management system and engagement strategies. Furthermore, the School will continue its transition to GCDocs in order to increase collaboration and information sharing across the organization.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Program 1.1: Foundational Learning

The School continued to support whole-of-government priorities such as the Open Government initiative, which aims to transform data, information and dialogue practices to achieve a more transparent, cost-effective, efficient and responsive government. In 2013–14, the School delivered training to over 3,000 public service employees on GCDOCS, a government-wide solution for records management, to support members of the information management community and other public service employees transitioning to this new system.

Further, in collaboration with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s Chief Information Officer Branch and Library and Archives Canada, the School undertook a comprehensive review of its information management curriculum in order to support the new and emerging needs of information management specialists across the public service.

In support of the Government of Canada’s Email Transformation Initiative and in response to learning needs, the School worked in partnership with Shared Services Canada to offer training modules for public service employees, administrative users and IT service providers within the public service to support the transition to the new email system.

Internal Services

In support of the Government of Canada’s Open Government initiative and Directive on Recordkeeping, the School undertook a number of business process improvements related to its technology infrastructure to improve system capacity and data integrity in support of its online common learning platform. The School also continued its transition to GCDOCS in support of increased collaboration and information sharing across the organization.

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Review knowledge and information management systems that support the delivery of the environmental assessment process under CEAA 2012, which will include identifying potential system improvements to streamline the management of EA information and tasks;

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

The number of Access to Information requests processed during this period remained comparable to the previous year, however the number of pages processed increased exponentially, representing a volume of pages processed that was 18 times higher than the previous fiscal year (2012-13) and more than 460 times higher than fiscal year 2011-12. This increase in processing has had a significant impact on human and financial resources and requirements.

The Agency carried out extensive planning to streamline and upgrade the Agency’s records and document management system, develop an information architecture, and assess human resource requirements to support longer-term information management. A five-year information strategy was developed.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • The Agency has developed a medium-term strategic plan (IM/IT Campaign Plan) to guide IM/IT activities. Another key initiative within this plan is information management. The objective of this initiative is to better enable active management of the Agency’s information holdings in order to fulfill the growing need for timely, consistent, accessible, and trusted information, and to ensure foundational systems are in place to support the Agency’s modernization efforts.
  • Additionally, the CFIA will continue to work towards completing a series of Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Modernization improvements by developing and implementing a Privacy Policy Framework. Although work began in 2012–13, with respect to this initiative, the new Policy will be finalized and communicated to CFIA staff through information sessions in 2013–14.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

The CFIA made progress in the area of information and record management by exploring modern information management and collaborative solutions, while continuing to maintain and enhance its existing foundation. More specifically, the Agency:

  • partnered with Library and Archives Canada , to improve its paper holdings archives;
  • implemented TBS’s Standard on Email Management and Record Keeping policies;
  • initiated, as part of Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) Record Keeping compliance, a number of activities related to information assets, including:
    • revision of the file classification plan to a function based system;
    • identification and completion of an inventory of records; and
    • revisions to the file retention plan to revisit the schedules for retention.
  • explored software options for collaborative solutions, which will complement the existing information systems widely used by staff as standard repositories, so as to better manage information assets and fulfill the growing need for timely, consistent, accessible, and trusted information.
  • as part of Open Government, implemented ATIP By-Online, which allows for access to information and privacy (ATIP) requests for CFIA information to be done online.

Canadian Heritage

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

  • In addition, Canadian Heritage implemented a standardized information classification system for the management of digital records, and initiated a department-wide review of digital information holdings.

Canadian Human Rights Commission

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • implementing the Information Management and Record Keeping Directive by March 2015 to prepare the Commission for the closure of federal record centres and the launch of the government-wide eOffice initiative;

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

The Commission has made steady progress on the government’s Directive on Recordkeeping, which is a base requirement for eOffice, an open networked environment for service delivery. The Commission is well positioned to comply with the directive by March 2015, in line with the closure of the federal records centres. Many federal and international organizations, such as the Association of Records Managers and Administrators, have recognized the quality of the Commission’s work in this area.

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

  • The ground work in implementing the CITT’s GCDocs solution was completed and only user implementation remains.

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • meeting commitments to open government and reducing costs and improving productivity, information sharing and storage capacity by instituting the systematic use of modern information management tools such as GCDOCs

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Organizational Priorities

CIC supported the Government of Canada Open Data Initiative by expanding access to the CIC Access to Information and Privacy online request application to 11 additional departments. In addition, CIC piloted GCDOCS (a document management system) and prepared for full roll-out in 2014–2015.

Internal Services

CIC piloted and prepared for full roll-out of GCDOCS, a new Government of Canada (GoC) document and records management software; developed a comprehensive Information Technology Security Plan to ensure business continuity; aligned business processes to ensure compliance with Treasury Board Secretariat recordkeeping directives; and, supported the GoC Open Data Initiative by expanding access to the CIC Access to Information and Privacy online request application to six additional departments.

Courts Administration Service

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • To meet CAS‘ information management needs and to comply with Treasury Board information management policies, principles, standards and practices, CAS will update its information management framework and implement a new Document Management System. This will enable technological integration with other corporate systems and ensure that digital information can be easily accessed and shared.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

  • CAS reviewed its Record Keeping Directive to ensure compliance with information management policies and practices. The review led to the development of training on information management and information security for members of the courts and employees. Further, the migration of court records to the new central repository database has set the foundation for the future implementation of an electronic document management system.

Department of Finance Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • The Department of Finance Canada will continue to improve its information management (IM) and information technology (IT) infrastructure and services, to manage security concerns in a manner that addresses both security and work environment requirements. The Department will also be updating its IM and IT Strategic Plan, first, to strengthen information management practices and work toward full implementation in 2015 of the Treasury Board Directive on Recordkeeping, and second, to ensure that the department’s employees continue to have the environment, tools and technical capacity to be effective and efficient by offering services in partnership with Shared Services Canada.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Organizational Priorities

The Department has been working toward the implementation of a collaborative client-focused approach to IM, a key element of the Treasury Board Directive on Recordkeeping, to which all departments must adhere by March 2015.

Internal Services

The Department worked toward the implementation of a collaborative client-focused approach to information management. The implementation of an information management solution is a key element of the Treasury Board Directive on Recordkeeping, which all departments must adhere to by March 2015.

The Department fulfilled its obligations under the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, although the caseload had almost doubled in the last three years. The Department’s compliance rate in responding to Access to Information Act requests within the statutory time frame was at 92 per cent.

Department of Justice Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • implement projects selected for their capacity to transform business processes through new ways of working, using modern, digital tools to create, share, and manage information securely
  • contribute to Government of Canada initiatives including the modernization of websites that serve the public, and transform departmental web publishing through a centralized model

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

As planned, the Information@Justice vision was developed based on extensive client and stakeholder consultations. The goal is to transform the Department of Justice into a more modern and collaborative digital work environment. The Department defined projects to introduce new tools and training, and established engagement strategies to support new ways of working that will enable Justice employees to find, share and manage information in a more efficient and sustainable manner. In addition, the Department launched a reorganized and redesigned Internet site that responds better to the needs of Canadians and better reflects the Government’s priorities. This new site is compliant with Government of Canada Web Standards and will produce metrics that will allow for measurements and continual improvements. The Department also has reduced, reorganized and improved content on its Intranet site to better meet the needs of employees and to better support effective corporate communications.

Departmental Information Management and Information Technology (IM/IT) functions incorporated additional oversight, control and reporting initiatives from the TBS Office of the Chief Information Officer Branch, as well as standardization through Shared Services Canada and the GC clustering initiative. IM/IT functions were also engaged in the GC Email Transformation, Windows 7 Deployment and Digital Information Repository and Workspace initiatives. GC Cyber and IT Security initiatives included GC-ISB Security Certification for Justice Employees and implementation of a variety of GC standards and directives designed to improve security of, and access to GC systems and protection of IT security data.

Employment and Social Development Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

Advancing the Department’s commitment to privacy renewal: HRSDC will continue to modernize its privacy processes, policies and support functions to ensure that it continues to meet the highest standards for the protection of personal information. This includes the horizontal coordination and prioritization of Department-wide privacy and security initiatives; program-led privacy action plans; the modernization of Information Sharing Agreements and Public Interest Disclosure management; and the renewal of the Department’s Privacy Policy suite, processes and tools. Privacy training and awareness will be strengthened to ensure that all employees understand their roles and responsibilities for the protection of personal information.

Further strengthening approaches to information management: HRSDC is moving to integrate information management in a more systematic way across the Department and modernize recordkeeping functions. All Departments are required to be in compliance with Treasury Board Secretariat’s new Directive on Recordkeeping by 2015. As part of this process, Library and Archives Canada has returned a large number of paper documents to the Department for review. HRSDC will examine its existing paper file holdings to determine which records should be kept, archived electronically or destroyed if no longer required. The Department will also make more active use of new technologies to improve the sharing of knowledge and information internally, as well as make further improvements to information security, including the security of personal information.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Organizational Priorities

Modernize the Government of Canada internet presence

The Government of Canada Web presence supports Canadians by providing easy, fast and convenient access to information and services online. Through Service Canada, ESDC is the principal publisher responsible for developing and managing a single Government of Canada website, Canada.ca. The site will provide an enhanced user experience; citizen-centric, theme-based content; and a common and enhanced Government of Canada search. Canadians will be able to locate detailed information on the programs and services offered through ESDC, as well as general information on all Government of Canada programs and services. The initial launch of Canada.ca in December 2013 established a number of key organizing principles focused on user needs. The key organizing principles were evolved and enhanced through subsequent releases that refined and improved the organization of topics within the themes and added features and functionality such as improved integration with social media content, improved feedback tools for users (such as an interactive blog) and mobile-optimized presentation.

Modernize privacy processes and policies and strengthen privacy training and awareness

In 2013–14, the Department finalized the review and approval of a new Departmental Policy on Privacy Management. The Policy lays out three strategic objectives:

  • to codify the Department’s baseline requirements and standards for the management and protection of personal information;
  • to communicate the roles and responsibilities of all employees with respect to privacy management and the protection of personal information; and
  • to monitor compliance with this new policy.

In 2013–14, the Department established an integrated work plan of initiatives to support the strategic planning and implementation of the Department’s privacy and security priorities. These included the development, review, and approval of new policies and guidance, privacy impact assessments, information sharing agreements, continued implementation of Program-led Privacy Action Plans and non-administrative uses of personal information to support policy analysis, research and evaluation activities. Implementation of a re-designed Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) process, including the development of new tools, continued. These tools include PIA guidance materials for employees who are new to PIAs; and a generic inbox to triage and prioritize requests.

The Department conducted a series of activities in 2013–14 to raise awareness of privacy and security requirements and promote the stewardship of information, including corporate communications, privacy and security awareness events (convened over 30 awareness sessions), and the establishment of an employee portal with easily accessible information on employee roles and responsibilities. In addition, all ESDC branches and regions developed plans to raise awareness of employee privacy and security responsibilities and reported full engagement of departmental employees.

The Department also launched a new mandatory training module on the Stewardship of Information and Effective Workplace Behaviours, which included training on privacy, security, information technology security, information management, access to information, and values and ethics. This course supports the Department’s commitment to the responsible use and care of departmental and personal information.

Modernize recordkeeping functions:

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) developed a Recordkeeping Action Plan that outlines the goals, objectives, and approved information management strategies required to meet the Treasury Board Secretariat Directive on Recordkeeping by 2015. The action plan ensures that: recordkeeping requirements are built into programs, services design and processes; supportive governance and accountability structures are adopted; and information resources are managed, regardless of medium or form, to ensure their authenticity, accuracy, integrity, clarity, reliability, availability and completeness for as long as required to support business operations. By March 31, 2014, the integration of information management (IM) policies and practices, information architecture and a plan of action to adopt GCDOCS for document management was completed.

Integrate information management across the Department:

ESDC completed a cleanup of information and data of business value across data repositories, implementing a secure file service for sensitive documents, establishing a classification structure and making mandatory training and resource information available to all employees. To date, approximately 5,800 ESDC employees have taken the IM courses at the Canada School of Public Service.

Internal Services
Further strengthening approaches to information managementESDC has developed a comprehensive plan for achieving the 2015 government-wide Record Keeping Directive for the management of information. By March 31, 2014, ESDC completed the integration of information management policies and practices into an online departmental platform, including the development of a plan of action to integrate GCDOCS, the Government of Canada-approved electronic document and records management solution. In addition, an ESDC 2013–14 Multi-year IT Security Program was developed, directly responding to recommendations by Internal Audit Service Branch, the Office of the Auditor General, third-party security assessment and other inputs.

Environment Canada

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Completed the transformation of library services into a virtual library, providing a full range of services to all employees across Canada.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Use of Web Technology — Expand the use of web technology as a new service delivery channel by ensuring compliance with Treasury Board’s Standard on Web Accessibility by July 2013 and by increasing the Department’s virtual library services (led by the Human Resources and Corporate Services Sector).
  • Information Management Strategy Action Plan — Implement the 2013-14 portion of the Department’s Information Management Strategy Action Plan to safeguard the Department’s information assets and improve service delivery (led by the Human Resources and Corporate Services Sector).

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Organizational Priorities

Demonstrated leadership in Information Management and Technology Services by implementing progressive and innovative working arrangements such as commencing implementation of Workplace 2.013 where economical and feasible; expanding the use of web technology as a new service delivery channel by ensuring compliance with Treasury Board’s Standard on Web Accessibility; implementing application and information strategies to improve service delivery such as updating Internet, Intranet sites, and the Department’s library catalogue; and implemented the 2013-14 portion of the Department’s Information Management Strategy Action Plan to safeguard the Department’s information assets.

Internal Services

Implemented the 2013-14 portion of the Department’s Information Management Strategy Action Plan.

Health Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Key initiatives include the implementation of common HR processes; a strategy for aging IT; a National Accommodation Strategy; and, the initial implementation of an Enterprise Content Management System.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Deployment delays of the TBS authorized tool for GCDOCs, caused Health Canada to shift its efforts from the implementation of an Enterprise Content Management System towards Information Management Readiness.

Immigration and Refugee Board

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

In 2013–14, the IRB continued to emphasize its alignment to the Government of Canada’s new service model for the outsourcing of document storage and retrieval services. It established cost-recovered services from Library and Archives Canada for the disposition of information resources. The Board improved its information management (IM) program by completing several key and foundational projects identified in its IM Framework Action Plans. The IRB established an IM governance structure, completed a full inventory of its information repositories, identified its Information Resources of Business Value (IRBV) and established a risk profile for the protection of these IRBVs. The Board researched options for the introduction of an electronic document repository, which resulted in a GCDOCS End State Report and an implementation options report.

Infrastructure Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Support the Government of Canada’s Directive on Recordkeeping: An Infrastructure Canada recordkeeping management project will be concluded to ensure compliance with the Treasury Board Secretariat Directive by March 31, 2015

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Took measures to support the Treasury Board Secretariat Directive on Recordkeeping. This project is putting in place the tools and processes necessary to ensure that information of business value is managed in accordance with updated policy requirements and best practices. (This project is to be concluded by the Treasury Board Secretariat’s deadline of March 31, 2015).

National Film Board of Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Modifying the media information system is an aspect of information management at the NFB. The objective is to adapt the existing systems to cope with the increasing digitization of data and the NFB’s various media management and processing activities. The NFB will thus improve the effectiveness of its systems, while ensuring they meet government standards.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

The modification of the media asset management system began in 2013–14. It will be recalled that the objective is to adapt the existing systems to cope with the increasing digitization of data and the NFB’s various media management and processing activities. The new system should become operational in 2014–15.

Natural Resources Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Adopt an enterprise-wide solution for electronic records and document management (GCDocs).

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Organizational Priorities

NRCan’s new document management application, GCDOCS, was advanced substantially in 2013-14. Key milestones completed include the development and approval of the Project Management Plan, employee engagement, functional testing, completion of pilots, and implementation in some parts of the Department.

Internal Services

NRCan met several milestones related to information and document management processes and tools in 2013-14. These included the launch of the new consolidated Departmental website, which replaced the existing collection of branch, sector and corporate websites. The new, smaller web presence allows for enhanced navigation and usability in accordance with the Standard on Web Usability. The Department completed some of its information management-related priorities. Key milestones related to the GCDOCS document management tool were completed in 2013-14, including the development and establishment of the GCDOCS environment, functional testing, development of the departmental information architecture, completion of pilots, resolution of some system performance issues, and partial implementation in some of NRCan’s organizational units.

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Developing an Open Access Policy: In 2013-14 and beyond, NSERC will continue its work on developing an Open Access policy for research publications, in collaboration with SSHRC and CIHR.
  • Follow-up Audit on Information Management: In 2013-14, NSERC will carry out a follow-up audit to ensure that recommendations outlined in previous information management audits have been implemented and that any issues identified have been addressed. This follow-up audit is expected to be completed in 2013-14.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Organizational Priorities

In 2013-14, NSERC and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) held an online consultation on the draft Tri-Agency Open Access Policy. A summary of the common themes raised in the online consultation and a full report on the consultation is available on the NSERC and SSHRC websites. NSERC, SSHRC, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) are currently seeking final approvals for the adoption and implementation of a harmonized approach to the policy.

Northern Pipeline Agency

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

The Agency continued to implement its knowledge management and digitization project to digitize major historical and archival records of project and regulatory decisions.

The Agency updated its website with current and relevant information, including a link to an electronic library containing an extensive listing of historical reports on northern pipelines.

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Strengthen Information Management
    • In keeping with direction from central agencies, Elections Canada continues to strengthen its information management program. As we prepare to consolidate all employees in a single building, we are taking this opportunity to identify information of business value, establish information-retention periods and dispose of electronic and paper information that is no longer required.
    • Additionally, we will extend our efforts to digitize paper records of business value, categorizing and storing them in a new corporate information structure. This information architecture will allow us to carry out a pilot project in 2013–2014 of a computer application that efficiently captures, retrieves and manages records in an electronic-information environment, while protecting the integrity of personal information.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

In keeping with direction from central agencies, Elections Canada continued to strengthen its information management program by testing an electronic document management system (GCDocs) through a pilot project.

With the office relocation to Gatineau, Elections Canada identified and implemented efficiencies in collaboration with the other agents of Parliament in the building. These resulted in:

  • a unique library serving four agencies

Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Organizational Priorities

Information Technology maintained a high level of availability and quality of operation, and various upgrading initiatives were pursued to align FJA systems with government-wide ones and to improve efficiency (e.g., reduce double entry of data). FJA continued to implement the Management Action Plan of the Office of the Comptroller General (OCG) Horizontal Audit on electronic record keeping. Specific actions included the scanning of historical documents and updating the information architecture.

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

[W]orked with the other agents of Parliament located in the new building at 30 Victoria Street in Gatineau, Quebec, which resulted in:

  • the establishment of a shared space for a library for four agents (the sharing of support systems and personnel will be explored next year);

Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Further enhance information sharing and promote collaboration by fully implementing a new electronic document management system.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

The Office continued to identify opportunities for collaborative services with other Agents of Parliament with a view to generate efficiencies, reduce operational risks and/or improve services. A number of collaborative services were established, including the consolidation of mailrooms with co-tenants, a shared library with the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages (OCOL) and Elections Canada, and a shared interview room to conduct investigations and shared space for the provision of IT users assistance services with OCOL.

Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Continue to develop and implement an enterprise information and FRFI data management strategy and framework, as per sound Enterprise Information Management principles, to ensure OSFI effectively obtains, captures and shares FRFI information.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Met all project milestones as part of OSFI’s Information Technology renewal program, including

  • Developed correspondence and inquiry management and document/records management/collaboration systems.

Parks Canada Agency

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Continue identifying information resources of business value and required controls to facilitate the effective management, sharing and use of information in compliance with the Treasury Board Directive on Recordkeeping.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

  • In accordance with the Treasury Board Directive on Recordkeeping, Parks Canada business units continue to make good progress identifying and documenting Information Resources of Business Value (IRBV) that support and inform the Agency’s core decision‐making processes and management of programs.

Privy Council Office

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • continue to implement PCO’s multi-year strategy to improve recordkeeping practices, in support of effective and efficient business processes and compliance with Government of Canada legislation and policy on the management of records and information

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

 

  • Launched an initiative to modernize and strengthen PCO’s classified information technology (IT) networks, which is expected to be completed in 2014–15. Investments were also made to develop innovative IT solutions and tools, such as the Machinery Events Management System and the Autonomy Enterprise System;
  • Working closely with Public Works and Government Services Canada, PCO launched a Digitization Strategy to successfully convert over three million pages of classified paper records into a digital format, allowing for fast and accurate search and retrieval;
  • Implemented an electronic document management system in order to successfully streamline the review of documents, and the production of certificates, as required under section 39 of the Canada Evidence Act. This has resulted in considerable improvement in the efficiency of the review process

Public Health Agency of Canada

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Efforts were also focussed on Information Management (IM) Readiness, including implementation of the IM Strategy and integration of harmonized IM policy instruments.

Public Safety Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Public Safety Canada will also continue the implementation of the Information Management Strategic Action Plan in an effort to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the information management function.
  • [C]ontinue the Department’s transition to a Virtual Library, which includes the digitization of print materials and the collection of electronic resources to support the Department’s greening goals.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

With regard to information management (IM) and information technology (IT), the Department participated in the development of the interim Government of Canada Secret Infrastructure (iGCSI), whereby information exchange gateways were established between Public Safety Canada and a number of federal departments.  Moreover, existing secret networking capability was extended to Public Safety Canada’s regional offices and classified telephony was enhanced to meet requirements of senior departmental officials. Lastly, the Department finalized its implementation of the three-year IM Strategic Plan and completed the construction of a Virtual Library, enabling employees to access all library electronic resources from their desktop.

Public Service Labour Relations Board

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • In addition to continuing to implement its IM strategy and action plan, throughout 2013-14, the PSLRB will issue an IM policy suite and promote good record-keeping practices. The organization also plans to create an IM Centre of Expertise that, combined with several communications initiatives, will offer employees the tools and support they need to effectively manage their information.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

The PSLRB also continued to work towards implementing its information management strategy and action plan, focusing on training all employees on the upgraded version of its electronic records and document management system (i.e., Documentum). Key activities included finalizing the file classification structure and file naming convention and completing the Documentum user manual.

Public Works and Government Services Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • PWGSC will enhance Information Management practices to support effective decision making, facilitate knowledge retention and enable better delivery of PWGSC services and programs.
  • PWGSC is also implementing a new records management Service Delivery Model comprised of a Centre of Expertise and Branch Operations Model, to focus on PWGSC‘s recordkeeping obligations and is also enhancing internal promotion of good recordkeeping practices. A project was also initiated to review, analyze and develop action plans to address branch legacy record and information holdings. This work will support the establishment of an inventory of all structured and unstructured information repositories, including shared drives. A review of the electronic records currently captured and maintained within the current electronic document management system is also underway to assess their business value and retention; and disposition requirements. This work will facilitate the migration to GC Docs the new information management software.
  • In order to respond on time to Access to Information (ATI) requests, PWGSC‘s Access to Information and Privacy Directorate will continue to provide training and support for ATIP liaison officers and employees in the Department in order to maintain consistent results in ATI response rates. An action plan was developed in 2012-13 by the Privacy Working Group, which has been established to identify opportunities for the improvement of the PWGSC‘s management of personal information by looking at best practices in other institutions and reviewing the Department’s privacy breach protocol.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Expanded Document Imaging Services to support federal government departments and agencies in their transformation initiatives by reducing the need to store large volumes of paper documents and allowing departments to improve client service and reduce operational costs.

Enabled federal clients using Government of Canada common information, human resources and materiel management systems to leverage economies of scale through the sharing of common functionality, expertise and resources.

After almost 173 years, the printed copy of the Canada Gazette came to an end in 2013-14. On March 31, 2014, the PWGSC‘s Canada Gazette Directorate (CGD)—whose mandate until then was to publish, print and distribute the Canada Gazette, Part I, Part II and Part III—commemorated the end of the Canada Gazette’s paper era and highlighted its transition to an exclusively electronic format.

Apart from this major improvement in the publication of the Canada Gazette, PWGSC also continued with service improvements in other areas including: upgrades to its public opinion research and advertising information systems; improvements to the solicitation process and implementation of a new suite of procurement instruments for advertising services; and continued work for a new Integrated Library System (ILS) to better serve our clients.

PWGSC played a key role in the transformation and the advancement of the innovation agenda, working closely with TBS and Shared Services Canada (SSC) to advance the GC-wide implementation strategy for GCDOCS by supporting the development of the business case, functional requirements, and future operational model. PWGSC continued to support government initiatives such as the Email Transformation Initiative (ETI). PWGSC continued to implement the Enterprise Knowledge and Information Management Strategy (EKIMS), working extensively with the IM community to promote EKIMS, making links with the recordkeeping directive and the ETI transformation. Key highlight of the EKIMS implementation was the successful IM Day held in November 2013. Requisite policy changes progressed with the new Departmental IM/IT Governance Framework.

The Department established an inventory of all information repositories, and also reviewed the electronic records within its electronic document management system in order to facilitate the migration to the Government of Canada standard solution for document management.

Statistics Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • The Agency is conducting a comprehensive review and automation of its internal services and launching the development of the data service centre initiative for statistical information management.
  • Consult with other departments and Treasury Board Secretariat to get more information about the functionality of Systems, Applications and Products (SAP) and PeopleSoft —and the interoperability of these tools —as well as GCDOCS and email, to evaluate the timing and roadmap for migration to these common tools.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Continue to strengthen the corporate information management framework: Information management (IM) is integral to the strategic outcome of the national statistical office—to provide Canadians with access to a trusted source of information. Statistics Canada’s IM Action Plan addresses the highest priority IM challenges that the Agency faces as it pursues the corporate objectives of relevance, trust, access and stewardship. Initiatives are aligned with the priority components of the Enterprise Government of Canada IM Framework: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/im-gi/ims-sgi/ims-sgi-eng.asp. IM continues to be a key principle of the Agency’s CBA initiative. The integration of good IM practices into business processes is a key part of several strategic projects. The goal is to facilitate the identification and management of information resources of business value. In 2013/2014, Statistics Canada continued to monitor the implementation of the Directive on the Management of Statistical Microdata Files and the Directive on the Management of Aggregate Statistics. Work continued to prepare for the implementation of GCDOCS to replace the software used by the Document Management Centre. Business processes were analyzed to identify information resources of business value for statistical processes and their information management requirements including preservation and disposition schedules. A strategy on statistical standards was approved and the action plan received corporate funding for implementation. The data service centre initiative began. Once completed, this single corporate approach to registering files will facilitate access to all of the Agency’s key statistical holdings by authorized users.

Initiate the development of the new dissemination model: Over the last number of years, www.statcan.gc.ca has played a leading role in statistical data dissemination, both nationally and internationally. The goal of the new dissemination model is to modernize Statistics Canada’s methods and framework for the coherent dissemination of data to the public, including on the website, with the focus on aggregated statistics. This four-year project, launched in 2012/2013, includes developing a single output data repository to drive dynamically generated data tables; simplifying the product line to ensure consistency in product availability, presentation and functionality across the different subject-matter areas; reviewing the organization of the website and navigation strategy to ensure that Statistics Canada data are easy to find; and reviewing the output formats being offered, including the implementation of a web data service. In 2013/2014, the Agency initiated development of proposed systems, and began iterative usability testing of the proposed prototypes.

Develop, test and implement the new Government of Canada Open Data Portal infrastructure and user interface: The Government of Canada produces vast amounts of data to support delivery in areas such as health, environment, agriculture and natural resources. The Open Data Portal was developed to create a central location for making government data freely available in machine-readable formats. Statistics Canada was asked to host, develop, and maintain the next generation of the Government of Canada’s Open Data Portal that was successfully launched on June 18, 2013. The launch of this site enabled Canada to meet its international commitments under the G8 Open Data Charter. Statistics Canada continues to support and enhance the portal infrastructure and user interface. This extension to Statistics Canada’s portfolio ties into the Agency’s goals and objectives of providing greater access to statistical data for the Canadian public.

Develop a corporate approach for the governance, acquisition, use and disposition of administrative data: Statistics Canada has a long history of using administrative data for economic and social statistics, as well as for census and demographic programs. These data can provide high-quality input, while minimizing the burden on respondents. Statistics Canada recognizes the need to manage and reduce wherever possible the burden on small and medium-sized businesses and on individual Canadians. Further, administrative and secondary data sources yield the potential to develop new information series on new and emerging issues at a reduced cost and without increasing global response burden when compared to traditional statistical surveys. To enhance its use of administrative or secondary data, Statistics Canada will review its practices and use to ensure a consistent, coherent corporate approach to the acquisition, management, use, and disposition of such data. In 2013/2014, the Agency conducted an international review of governance and related frameworks for using administrative and secondary data sources. A review of current internal practices was undertaken to identify existing processes for acquiring, using and managing administrative data. Work started on developing an evaluation framework for administrative data that will more rapidly assess their fitness for use. Recommendations were made to optimize processing of administrative data.

Statistics Canada continues to

  • seek opportunities with other federal departments to obtain administrative data as a means of reducing response burden and expanding information holdings.
  • leverage the network of provincial/territorial statistical agencies and resources to develop additional national information products, based on federal/provincial/territorial administrative data. For example, in 2013/2014, Statistics Canada began a collaborative proof-of-concept pilot project to produce a new nationally comparable data series, using income support/social assistance administrative data. This work will continue in 2014/2015.
  • collaborate with international organizations to share best practices and pool research findings to facilitate enhanced use of administrative data.
  • explore potential for official statistical purposes of transactional data held by private enterprises.

Supreme Court of Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • The Library and Information Management Branch supports the information management needs of the organization. Priorities for 2013-14 include:
    • Reviewing the results of the GC Docs Pilot Project and developing a migration strategy to deploy GC Docs across the organization.
    • Improving the search experience and the efficiency and effectiveness of searching for information across organizational repositories.
    • Ensuring that the Office of the Registrar is able to meet its obligations under the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Directive on Recordkeeping.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

The Library and Information Management Branch supports the information management needs of the organization.  Results for 2013-14 include:

  • To confirm that the GC Docs Pilot Project could be deployed across the organization, a proof of concept to test the interoperability of C-doc, the Court’s document system for case-related documents and GCDOCS, using the AGA tool from Open Text, was investigated.  A prototype demonstrated that closed case files, with their proceedings related metadata, could be migrated from C-doc to GCDOCS, and that enterprise searching across both systems could be achieved.  Shortcomings in the transfer of case-related metadata, and in the management of physical case files, will be reviewed in the coming year.  Archiving and preservation of the case file in electronic format is the ultimate goal.
  • An improved search experience for internal users of the document and records systems, and the efficiency and effectiveness of searching for information across organizational repositories, was successfully demonstrated.  An older repository of historical case summaries and judgments will be migrated in the coming year.
  • Ensuring that the Office of the Registrar is able to meet its obligations under the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Directive on Recordkeeping has been a key objective.  An implementation plan for the Recordkeeping Directive was approved and submitted to TBS CIO Branch for review.

Transportation Safety Board of Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • The second priority for Internal Services in 2013–14 is to improve the tools and guidance with respect to information management. During 2012–13, the TSB undertook two important initiatives that serve as important information management foundation work: the identification of information resources of business value and the implementation of an electronic records and data management system on a pilot basis. The TSB will build on the lessons learned from these initiatives in prioritizing the next steps to improve its information management tools and guidance. Additionally, the TSB will complete its work on the modernization of the Marine investigations database that captures occurrence information and initiate work on the modernization of the Air investigations database.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

  • The elimination of support positions prompted a review and a realignment of some internal services. Examples of changes include the closure of the TSB library, the closure of the department’s warehouse in the National Capital Region and the transfer of compensation activities to Public Works and Government Services Canada shared services. Internal Services procedures were reviewed and updated to streamline and eliminate redundancies. Employees have been encouraged to use on-line self-service tools. Internal service levels were reviewed and reduced in some areas. Work was redistributed to other positions within the organization, including making greater use of existing support staff within the branches.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • Continue to implement Open Government, including key commitments in Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government, in particular “open data,” and modernize the Access to Information and Privacy program

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

The Secretariat exceeded its target for completion of planned policy activities that support the management of information across the Government of Canada.

The Secretariat successfully completed the five-year review of the Policy on Information Management. In addition, it published a new Standard on Email Management, which provides direction on managing email and instant messages, and safeguarding information of business value. Also, draft policy instruments including the Directive on Open Government and the Standard on Digitization of Source Paper Records were shared on GCpedia.

Veterans Affairs Canada

2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

  • The Department will continue its work on retention and disposition of records. The goal is to complete the appropriate disposal of all electronic and paper records by March 2015.

2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

The Department implemented various initiatives during the year to provide employees with more streamlined processes and the tools to deliver internal services. Examples include:

  • A new Access to Information and Privacy system allowing requestors to submit and pay for ATIP requests online.
  • Preparation for implementation of a new electronic document and records management system (GCDocs) to allow for more efficient and effective management and access to electronic documents.

The Department recognizes that effective privacy management requires ongoing vigilance and commitment. During the year, there was continued focus on improving staff awareness by providing training on the requirements of privacy protection to 898 people. The Department’s efforts to promote a privacy-aware culture were evidenced by the fact that privacy breaches decreased by over 40% in the 2013–14 fiscal year.

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13 Questions With… Amanda Wakaruk

Posted by Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-10-16

With Government Information Day taking place on October 16 in Ottawa, this week we are profiling members of the library and IM community who work with government information: 13 Questions + 3 bonus questions about government information.

Amanda Wakaruk

Government Information Librarian, University of Alberta Libraries

Photo of Amanda Wakaruk

A hero who has inspired you in your career?

She’d laugh at me for calling her a hero but Vivienne Monty has provided me with mentorship and inspiration multiple times over the course of my career. Her own career choices, service to the profession, and scholarship have reinforced the importance of government information practitioners and the pursuit of the profession and its values as a noble cause in its own right.

The first job you ever held and at what age?

Information Dissemination Agent (aka newspaper route delivery girl), age 10. Had to leave my part-time volunteer gig at the school library to take the job.

Your first position in the library and/or information services field?

Page (shelver) in a public library (not counting the volunteer gig in grade 4/5).

Coolest thing in your cubicle or office?

Framed copy of The Canadian Bill of Rights (with a University of Alberta Govt Docs acquisition stamp in the top right corner: August 2, 1961).

What is your guilty pleasure?

Roller coasters — the more kinetic energy they produce, the better.

Career advice – what’s your top tip?

Don’t be afraid to change employers if you are not achieving your goals in your current position. Life is too short and Canadian living standards are too high to spin your wheels for 35 hours or more a week. Take a risk!

What useless skill(s) do you possess?

I can dance the tandem Charleston without injuring myself or others.

Proudest moment in your professional life?

Receiving off-the-record gratitude from front line information professionals in government agencies and IGOs for my contributions to collaborative services like the CGI DPN, conference presentations, and writing about the current state of access to government information.

Academic government information librarians in tenured positions have a responsibility to use their academic freedom in ways that benefit the profession as a whole and, by extension, those who use government information in their work, personal lives, and scholarship. The nature of this work does not lend itself to typically sanctioned awards or accolades; recognition that this work is useful from those closest to the issues is a source of pride.

If you had 24 hours all to yourself, how would you best like to spend it?

I wouldn’t spend it alone. Most of the day would be playing strategy-intensive board games with my partner and friends (new and old) in a board game cafe in one of the many cities around the globe that host these fabulous places. Evening hours would have to include short films and exceptionally good wine.

If you didn’t work in the information industry, what would you be doing?

Something that brings together planning, design, and creative output… architecture, urban planning, barista?

Finish this sentence: “In high school, I would have been voted the person most likely to … “

…See places. I was a Travel Club member and spent more hours driving my car than I did in class.

How do you stay current in your field?

Twitter, conferences, colleagues. Sadly, it’s a struggle to make time for all three.

What opportunities does the shift to digital-only government information present to the library community and to users?

It takes less financial capital investment to act as stewards for web-based government information and it is easier for curation to happen at arms’ length from the publishing agencies. However, this doesn’t mean that it’s free or simple. Acting on opportunities for collaboration is very important.

What should every information professional know about gov docs?

Four Government Information Precepts for Non-Government Information Librarians

1. Access to government information is the foundation of a functioning democracy and underpins informed citizen engagement.

Government information allows us to assess our governing bodies — a necessary requirement for a properly functioning democracy. Government records accessed through Freedom of Information legislation, Public Accounts, the Debates of the House of Commons and Senate, and court records, are just a few examples of government information, also called ‘government documents.’

Government agencies collect data during the provision of programs and services and produce publications providing citizens with an authoritative source of information about the society they live in. These are often referred to as ‘government publications.’

2. Government information has enduring value. Don’t waste precious time re-questioning this fact and do your librarianly duties.

Don’t confuse low present-value price tags with low value overall. This is a commerce-based construct of value that you should have learned to identify and interrogate in library school. It’s true that many government publications cost less than other containers of knowledge. This is, in part, because your tax dollars have funded, or at least subsidized, their production. It is not a reflection of their current or enduring value.

Consider the following:

  • the work of countless academics and other experts is disseminated via government information
  • government publications and documents are used by most academics and social commentators in all areas of intellectual output, resulting in the production of  books, reports, speeches, etc., which have shaped our society and understanding of the world
    • scientists use government information to make assertions about nearly every subject  (environment, energy, meteorology, etc., e.g., Silent Spring was full of references to government information)
    • social scientists use government information to make informed observations and help shape policy discussions (including statistics compiled using methodology standardized by international governmental organizations like the United Nations)
    • legal scholars, lawyers, and judges need access to legislative and court documents to interpret and apply the law
    • journalists use government documents to inform the electorate about their governing bodies (insert most political scandals here)
  • government employees need long-term access to government information to develop, implement, and monitor policies, programs, and services (and it is not uncommon for them to contact academic libraries to obtain copies that are no longer available to them via other channels)

3. Government information is precarious and requires stewardship.

Two separate but related issues are at work here.

The first is that governments do not necessarily make collecting and preserving access to their own work a priority. The strongest system of stewardship for government information is one that operates in partnership with, and at arms-length of, author agencies. This kind of structure is equally important in both print and online environments. For generations, this task was the responsibility of depository libraries.

Secondly, please don’t be fooled by the call of the “it’s all online” brigade. Most government publishing moved online earlier than other types of publishing and has suffered from not having an a priori comprehensive digital preservation plan. “Born digital” content is also at a high risk for (intentional and unintentional) removal from open access environments. There are groups in both Canada (CGI DPN) and the United States (GODORT) that are starting to document these losses.

Not only is everything NOT available online, not everything born digital is made accessible and/or indexed by search engines like Google. Policies and procedures developed by the government in power determine what is distributed in an online environment and how it is preserved (or removed) for public access.

4. Government publications and documents are different than most books, journals, and content born on the Internet.

Get over any illusions of control that served you while working with other types of content. Government publications and documents are more challenging to acquire, organize, and provide access to.

The biggest differences between government information and other types of information products can be explained by why and how they were published. The agencies that produce government information are motivated by different factors than traditional publishers like Elsevier, HarcourtBrace, and the American Chemical Society. While many politicians appear to be obsessed with finances, they do not rely on publishing revenue to fund our military, repair our roads, or support re-election campaigns. Not only do few politicians or bureaucrats care if government documents or publications are read or cited, we often learn that efforts are made to obfuscate their purpose, delay their release, and even prevent their dissemination. This makes it more challenging to find, obtain, catalogue, and care for government documents and publications.

Government information is a lot like librarianship. It doesn’t fit into neat and tidy dissemination channels improved and simplified by years of customer feedback and the pursuit of higher profits. The very act of acquisition can feel like activism and inspire pugnacious outbursts from your government information librarians and implicated support staff. Government agencies and their priorities can change with the political winds and it is common for serial titles to start and stop, disappearing only to reappear under ever so slightly different titles or agency names.

Biggest surprise working in this subject area?

That even with recent changes in our global society some people still don’t understand the role and importance of access to government information in a democracy.

What would you like your headstone to read?

ATIP Request Number: A-20??-00009

Posted in 13 Questions, Government information, People | 1 Comment »

13 Questions With… Michelle Lake

Posted by Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-10-15

With Government Information Day taking place on October 16 in Ottawa, this week we are profiling members of the library and IM community who work with government information: 13 Questions + 3 bonus questions about government information.

Michelle Lake

Government Publications Librarian, Concordia University Libraries

Photo of Michelle Lake

A hero who has inspired you in your career?

My career as a librarian was inspired by many people over the years, including lots of wonderful teachers, professors and librarians, but my biggest career influences and heroes would have to be my parents. There was always an emphasis on education and reading in our home, as a family we would go to the public library every week for new books. My parents always modelled loyalty, hard work and dedication and I strive to achieve those values in my own work.

The first job you ever held and at what age?

The first job I ever held was at Zeller’s, at age 16, in the Toy’s and Children’s wear departments.

Your first position in the library and/or information services field?

My first paid position in the library or information services field was as a student shelver at the University of Guelph Library, during my undergrad. I also located missing books, which was my favourite part of the job; tracking down elusive items is very satisfying. Previous to that, I volunteered in my elementary school library, helping sort and put books away.

Coolest thing in your cubicle or office?

My favourite item is a stuffed owl (who wears glasses and is reading a book), that sits on top of my filing cabinet. He was a gift I received when I graduated from my MLIS and is my office mascot.

What is your guilty pleasure?

I don’t really believe in the “guilty pleasure”, I think that if there is a hobby or form of entertainment that adds something to your life, you should feel free to enjoy it.

My guilt free entertainment recommendation? Sleepy Hollow (the tv series), is completely bananas and I love it, if you’re looking for something fun and not at all historically accurate, try it out.

Career advice – what’s your top tip?

Say yes. This is especially important at the beginning of your career, but is true throughout. You likely won’t end up in the exact job you pictured as your ideal when you started your MLIS, but that isn’t a bad thing. Our profession has so many different facets to it, and as a result, an incredible amount of opportunity.

On the practical side, I mean apply to all jobs that you are interested in, consider contracts, or consider moving to a new city; try to get as much experience doing different things as you can. I have worked in public and academic libraries, covering a wide range of social science and humanities subjects and those experiences have all helped inform my current position and skill set.

What useless skill(s) do you possess?

I possess a large amount of pop culture knowledge. I’m great with movie and TV trivia, which can be useful in a trivia team situation and/or those ‘quizzes’ they show before movies at the theatre.

Proudest moment in your professional life?

My proudest moments are usually from the interactions I have with students. I’ve had the privilege of working with some really great undergrad and graduate students and offering assistance with their library research. Hearing back from students that I have helped about their successful projects and research is a great reward.

If you had 24 hours all to yourself, how would you best like to spend it?

Sleeping in, drinking tea & eating pastries from my favourite local patisserie, perhaps a little spa time, having a meal + dessert with my friends and a walk in the autumn leaves.

If you didn’t work in the information industry, what would you be doing?

I would likely still be in the education field; I would probably be a teacher. I really like working with students and helping people access and understand information. My sister is a teacher, and is also a continual source of inspiration to me.

Finish this sentence: “In high school, I would have been voted the person most likely to … “

I honestly am not sure. It’s funny though, when I run into someone from those years or I catch up with old friends, their first reaction to my telling them I’m a librarian is a kind of knowing nod. I really love what I do, and I think it is definitely the right profession for me.

How do you stay current in your field?

I subscribe to a number of government information related listservs: CLAGIN, GOVINFO, INFODep, GODORT which are great for information sharing and keeping up-to-date with developments in the field.

I’m also a member of several library associations, and I regularly attend conferences and take webinars.

Twitter is also a really great tool for keeping current, there are so many interesting and dynamic librarians tweeting about our profession. I’m social media editor for ABQLA which has really added to my awareness of library news.

What opportunities does the shift to digital-only government information present to the library community and to users?

The shift to digital-only government information provides libraries and librarians with the opportunity to collaborate on digitization projects, initiatives and shared collections. I think it also provides us all with the opportunity and incentive to make our online portals to information more robust, and accessible, while providing the challenge (which the government information community is taking on quickly and efficiently) to be creative in our delivery of this information to the public.

Biggest surprise working in this subject area?

It’s not so much a surprise as a happy confirmation, that the government information community is very supportive and is thriving in a very challenging time. The partnerships, collaboration and resource sharing across all types of government information librarians and libraries is truly impressive and I am enthusiastic to see what the future brings.

What should every information professional know about gov docs?

That there are government information librarians!

Seriously though, the government information community is engaged and providing access to all manner of publications in many innovative ways.

There are excellent government information webpages and subject guides at academic libraries across Canada, there are custom google searches to uncover electronic documents and a wide variety of digitization projects across jurisdictions.

Find a government information librarian and/or their resources and use their expertise, it is useful in so many disciplines and for so many communities.

What would you like your headstone to read?

If you put your mind to it, you can accomplish anything. – M. McFly

Posted in 13 Questions, Government information, People | Leave a Comment »

13 Questions With… Catherine McGoveran

Posted by Govt Library and Info Mgmt Professionals Network on 2014-10-13

With Government Information Day taking place on October 16 in Ottawa, this week we are profiling members of the library and IM community who work with government information: 13 Questions + 3 bonus questions about government information.

Catherine McGoveran

Government Information Librarian, University of Ottawa
Co-Moderator, CLA Government Information Network (GIN)

Photo of Catherine McGoveran

A hero who has inspired you in your career?

To be honest, I’m inspired every day by a lot of people around me and even many I don’t know personally. I find inspiration from those that aren’t afraid to experiment, fail, and challenge themselves.

The first job you ever held and at what age?

My first job was as a Page, shelving books, at the Unionville Public Library in Markham when I was 15.

Your first position in the library and/or information services field?

My position as a Page was my first in libraries. I got started in libraries quite early, but didn’t know at that time that it would be a lasting trend.

Coolest thing in your cubicle or office?

Figurine of Finn from Adventure Time + pennant banner made from old maps of Canada.

What is your guilty pleasure?

Probably that I love Coronation Street, but I don’t feel very guilty about that.

Career advice – what’s your top tip?

Get as much relevant experience and meet as many people as you can, any way you can – working, volunteering, job shadowing, informal coffee, etc – and keep in touch with the professionals you meet.

What useless skill(s) do you possess?

Is there such a thing as a useless skill? Everything serves a purpose.

Proudest moment in your professional life?

When people ask me what I do for a living, I now get to respond by saying “I’m a librarian”. It’s a great feeling, particularly as a recent graduate.

If you had 24 hours all to yourself, how would you best like to spend it?

Making deluxe sandwiches, cycling, and playing all the board games (with friends and family, of course). That can be done in one day, right?

If you didn’t work in the information industry, what would you be doing?

If I worked totally outside the information industry, there a few other, wildly varying options I’d explore: pastry chef, locomotive engineer, or front-end developer.

Finish this sentence: “In high school, I would have been voted the person most likely to … “

I think I was actually voted the person most likely to “help others”. Yes, that’s the broadest category ever, but I’d say that librarianship definitely falls within this.

How do you stay current in your field?

My current go-to tool for staying up to date is Twitter. I back this up with blogs, articles, news stories, etc. I’d also define “my field” as quite broad, as I’m interested in exploring how we can take the trends or strategies used in other fields and apply them to librarianship.

What opportunities does the shift to digital-only government information present to the library community and to users?

For many groups, though not all, the shift to digital represents an increase in access to government information. As the same time, however, we must be increasingly cognoscente of the fact that digital information can be quick to change / disappear. Access and preservation must go hand-in-hand in this respect.

Biggest surprise working in this subject area?

This wasn’t necessarily a surprise, but being a new (gov info) librarian I was quite happy to be able to connect and get involved with the Canadian government information community. It’s been great to work with so many different colleagues on a wide variety of projects. There is lots of activity around government information in Canada and I’m thrilled to be working in this subject area.

What should every information professional know about gov docs?

The field of government information is quite complex. There are always new things to learn, new information to find, and a variety of challenges when finding and working with government information.

What would you like your headstone to read?

DON’T PANIC

Posted in 13 Questions, Government information, People | Leave a Comment »

 
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